2012 Honda Crosstour

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2012 Honda Crosstour

The Basics:

The Honda Crosstour, also sometimes called the Honda Accord Crosstour, is a really polarizing vehicle. At first sight, you're likely to either pronounce your love, or give a puzzled shrug of distaste.

Underneath, the Crosstour has components that are mostly shared with the V-6 Honda Accord Sedan, but much of the rest is very different. For starters, the Crosstour is taller, rides higher, and is quite a bit heavier; and its hatchback body style, at least at first look, teases a lot more utility and versatility than Accord Sedans.

The 2012 Honda Accord Coupe

With respect to seating, the Crosstour has a second chance to earn your appreciation, even if you're not a convert to its pumped-up-hatch styling ethos. The Crosstour rides a couple of inches higher than the Accord Sedan yet is 7.6 inches taller—which should, in theory, make the interior a more pleasant place. It is easier to get into and out of, but the downward slope of its roofline, as well as the fact that it curves inward, makes headroom a potential issue for six-footers in back. Cargo-wise, it's not a great situation either; between the strut towers, the higher-than-expected cargo floor, and the low glass, the space isn't all that useful. Backseats to flip forward, though.

At a whopping 650 pounds heavier than a base Accord Sedan, the Crosstour's heft is impossible to disguise. You feel it in stop-and-go driving, and all the nimble feel of the Accord Sedan is missing here. Gas mileage is also much lower—just 17/25 mpg with available all-wheel drive.

The 2012 Honda Crosstour comes equipped as well as an Accord V-6, and then some. A 360-watt sound system and dual-zone climate control are standard. And this year it's a better value with the addition of standard USB connectivity, Bluetooth hands-free, and a rear-view camera system. That rear camera will come in handy for shorter drivers, though taller ones will find visibility okay, thanks to the small, Insight-like rear window at the back. Honda has also adjusted a couple of its exterior paint hues for 2012.

For more, see either this review of the 2010 Honda Crosstour, or the full review of the 2012 Honda Accord Sedan.

Buying Tips:

The Crosstour's failure to launch means that, of all the Hondas on the new-car lot, it should be the easiest to haggle over. Honda dealers aren't known for being haggle-friendly, though, so be prepared with invoice pricing figures if you're determined to bring home a Crosstour.

Other Choices:

  • 2012 Acura TSX
  • 2012 Volkswagen Jetta
  • 2012 Kia Sorento

Reason Why:

The promise of Accord-plus goodness largely goes to waste in the Crosstour, and we can think of vehicles left and right that hit similar marks closer to the center of the target. For one, there's the new Acura TSX Sport Wagon, a real station wagon with the expected boost in room, and a nice, tidy look to boot. The Jetta SportWagen does the same at a discount, and has turbodiesel fuel economy, too. A purpose-built wagon with all-wheel drive, the Subaru Forester is to the Legacy what the Crosstour wants to be, to the Accord. Finally, you may just be better off with the, by comparison, straightforward idea of a crossover vehicle. A Kia Sorento has more seats, better gas mileage and visibility, and superior styling to the Crosstour--and it's cheaper.

The Bottom Line:

The 2012 Honda Crosstour pitches itself as more functional than the four-door Accord, and more stylish than a wagon might be, but in the end, isn't that much more spacious or attractive.

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