2014 Mazda MAZDA3 Review

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The Car Connection Expert Review

Bengt Halvorson Bengt Halvorson Deputy Editor
August 7, 2014

The 2014 Mazda 3 stands out from the small-car crowd, with its sport-car-influenced proportions and sporty driving experience; but its tight, noisy cabin means that it’s not at all the best pick for pragmatists.

The 2014 Mazda 3 is one of the best, and perhaps one of the most often overlooked, small cars on the market. A redesign has brought it truly attractive styling, more features, and better gas mileage that should make it a mandatory add to more small-car shopping lists.

These improvements come without disturbing what's been Mazda's primary appeal, particularly with the 3: it's one of just a handful of driver's cars in the segment, along with the Ford Focus and the VW Golf.

There's one asterisk we have to get to right off the bat: The svelte, almost sexy proportions of the new Mazda3 compromise its interior space. Provided you don't need a bigger car (like a Hyundai Elantra, which qualifies as a mid-size car) the Mazda 3 should stay on your list, as it's one of the best entries in the compact segment.

The 2014 Mazda 3 is a standout, in terms of styling and design, and its long hood and ‘cab-back’ design really cast it in a different light compared to most other compact cars. Adopting the automaker's Kodo "soul of motion" design language, first seen on the CX-5 crossover and Mazda6 mid-size sedan launched over the past two years, the Mazda 3 loses the creepy smile of the previous-generation car (or was that a smirk; we never quite knew) and takes on the brand's new blunt nose and five-point grille leading into thin, slanted, swept-back headlamps. A sweeping shoulder line slows gracefully along the body side and a more slanted, fastback roofline on the hatchback ends in what we see as a somewhat softer, less distinctive rear-end treatment.

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At its best, this combination of the aggressive front grile, crisp edges, and gentle curves, and hunkered-back cabin altogether makes the car look taut and sports-car influenced. At its worst, the Mazda 3 looks a little long-hooded—as if the hoodline of the Mazda 6 sedan had been grafted to the front of what’s otherwise a smaller car.

The entire structure of the new Mazda 3 has been designed around the SkyActiv four-cylinder engine, which Mazda began launching in 2012 models. This highly efficient four-cylinder engine uses high compression, carefully tuned exhaust systems, and other refinements to provide power while extracting maximum efficiency from every drop of fuel without the added complication of hybrid systems.

The 2014 Mazda 3 offers two different variants of the engine, and we think that no matter which one you choose you'll end up with a reasonably smooth, responsive combination. A 2.0-liter version is rated at 155 horsepower and 150 lb-ft of torque, and a more powerful 2.5-liter version puts out 184 hp and 185 lb-ft of torque. Each is available with a six-speed manual gearbox or a six-speed automatic transmission. At least initially, Mazda isn't offering the larger engine with the manual transmission, however, and it hasn't yet detailed the next high-performance Mazdaspeed3. The 3 gets retuned springs, shocks, and anti-roll bars to improve straight-line stability, and the automaker claims to have improved both cornering capacity and ride comfort. It says the Mazda 3's stopping distances are among the best of all compact cars (all models get four-wheel discs); meanwhile, electric power steering replaces the former electrohydraulic system.

Thanks to the new SkyActiv engines, the Mazda3 gets EPA highway fuel economy of up to 30 mpg city, 41 highway, and even the larger 2.5-liter engine returns up to 28 mpg city, 39 highway. Among the various features contributing to greater fuel efficiency is the i-ELOOP system, which uses a special alternator system and recharges the battery mainly during deceleration and braking. In a first for a production car, the system charges a capacitor—which can absorb a great deal of energy quickly—to recapture maximum energy during braking. For now, this feature is only offered in the top-level Grand Touring, with the Tech Package.

Overall, the Mazda3 is now at the head of the class with respect to powertrain performance. Most aspects of the driving experience are very satisfying—we'd call it far more athletic than your typical compact car. We find the suspension and dynamics to be excellent in tight hairpins, although the new steering didn't feel as confident on center on the highway, and a lot of ride harshness (and noise) still makes its way into the cabin compared to other cars in this class.

It's about half an inch shorter in height and 1.6 inches wider. The body structure is both 30 percent stiffer and lighter than the previous model, Mazda says, contributing to good handling and fuel efficiency together.

Car design is a game of give and take, so it's no surprise that the Mazda3’s long hood and swept-back proportions stake claims on what otherwise would be passenger space. We do wish that Mazda would have considered the practicality of the package just a bit more; its wheelbase is about 2.5 inches longer, yet the front pillars have been moved back nearly four inches and the cabin feels 'scrunched' accordingly, with the back seat suffering. The front-seat area is spacious, and seats are supportive (with newly contoured seats and more back and lateral support). In back, meanwhile, Mazda claims more knee room and shoulder room, but it feels tighter, in a fore-aft sense, than most other compact entries. The rear seatbacks are almost 2 inches higher, to improve comfort for back-seat passengers, which only serves to push the heads of taller riders up against the cardboard-like contoured headliner in models with the moonroof. One feature that's unusual in a new car is the bottom-hinged "organ-style" accelerator pedal, which Mazda says is more comfortable for drivers.

The 2014 Mazda 3, which has already been named an IIHS Top Safety Pick+ model this year, adds a number of new electronic safety systems to the company's compact car line. Each body style is fitted with six airbags: front and side bags for each front-seat passenger, and side-curtain bags stretching the full length of the cabin. Like all new cars, it has anti-lock brakes, stability control and traction control, a tire-pressure monitoring system, and other standard safety fittings. New for this model year are several systems that use a combination of camera and radar-based sensing to assist and alert the driver in potentially hazardous situations. Mazda groups all of the new safety systems together under the name i-ActivSense. They include adaptive cruise control, a blind-spot monitoring system, lane-departure warning alert, and headlights that switch automatically between low and high beams.

There's also a forward-obstruction warning system, which alerts drivers if the car is closing too quickly on an obstacle directly ahead. Mazda says that system operates at speeds from 9 to 92 mph. Finally, there's a new Smart City Brake Support system, which monitors closing distances and will pre-tension the brakes and alert the driver if a collision appears imminent at speeds up to 19 mph. If the driver doesn't respond in time, the system will automatically brake the car to a stop. Another interesting feature available in the Mazda 3 is the Active Driving Display—an odd heads-up display with its own little screen (which over two test cars wouldn't stay aimed in the line of sight).

One area where cars are evolving quickly is in infotainment, and the Mazda 3 is no exception. All 's' versions, as well as 'i' Grand Touring (and optioned 'i' Touring models) include the Mazda Connect system, which brings a large, colorful, high-contrast touch-screen display atop the dash (some might see it as looking like an aftermarket offering, but we like how it's high in the field of vision). Unlike the system in the larger Mazda6 and CX-5, with its laggy response, this system is quick and responsive, with relatively easy-to-navigate menus that can be selected with the touch screen or with the rotary (iDrive-like) Command Controller.

That system includes the now-standard AM/FM radio, CD player, optional SiriusXM satellite radio, and a USB jack and auxiliary audio input port for connecting digital music players. The premium audio option is a Bose system with Centerpoint virtual surround sound. Voice control allows users to search among folders, find tracks, repeat, and shuffle them using spoken commands. The system promises good usability, as you can use the Internet for finding locations, but the navigation system is onboard, with map and routing information stored on a SD card.

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2014 Mazda MAZDA3

Styling

Either as a curvaceous small sedan or hunkered-back hatchback, the 2014 Mazda 3 is a complete design expression with a lot of sports car influence.

The 2014 Mazda 3 isn’t just another look-alike compact car. We think it’s one of the trendsetters in its class, and its ‘cab-back’ design, with proportions that are more like that of a rear-wheel-drive car, really stand out among other small cars.

The new 3 adopts the company's Kodo "soul of motion" design language, first seen on the CX-5 crossover and Mazda6 mid-size sedan launched over the last two years. The new design improves aerodynamics and cuts drag. The front end might look blunt, but Mazda says both the five-door and sedan achieve drag coefficients of 0.275 and 0.255, respectively, which it deems best in class.

In front, the new Mazda 3 has lost the creepy smile of the previous-generation car (or was that a smirk, we never quite knew). The top corners of the characteristic five-point grille lead into thin, slanted, swept-back headlamps. The cabin is set further to the rear, making the profile dramatically different than the previous version, and other compact cars. The hood and engine compartment are stretched out, with the windshield pillars moved almost 4 inches rearward—in part to accommodate the specially tuned exhaust system of the SkyActiv four-cylinder engine. A sweeping shoulder line along the body side and a more slanted, fastback roofline on the hatchback ends in what Mazda terms "provoking" taillights with pointed ends.

At its best, this combination of the aggressive front grile, crisp edges, and gentle curves, and hunkered-back cabin altogether makes the car look taut and sports-car influenced. At its worst, the Mazda 3 looks a little long-hooded—as if the hoodline of the Mazda 6 sedan had been grafted to the front of what’s otherwise a smaller car.

For all their distinctiveness in front, both the sedan and the hatchback ended up a little too rounded and generic in back, we think. The design, and the proportions in general, definitely work better for the sedan than the hatch; although at the same time, more than one of our editors thought that the hatchback 3 nods to some classic fastback designs.

Inside, Mazda has redesigned the cockpit to focus on the driver, with pedals and manual controls arranged symmetrically around the driver's centerline. Among the design features toward that end are what Mazda calls the Active Driving Display. It's a clear panel that pops up from behind the instrument cluster when the car is turned on to show speed, turn-by-turn directions, and other critical information. The goal is to direct the driver's focus beyond the instruments and closer to the road ahead, while maintaining the best driving posture.

The instrument cluster itself uses a large central analog gauge, with a wing-shaped digital display on either side. Regrettably, Mazda has succumbed to the use of glossy piano black trim pieces for the center console and door accents, set off by satin chrome highlights.

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2014 Mazda MAZDA3

Performance

Among frugal small cars, the 2014 Mazda3 is one of the most entertaining and engaging to drive—although the steering might not quite measure up to expectations.

The last-generation Mazda 3 was one of the best-performing compact cars—excluding the company of ‘tuned’ special-performance models like the Mazdaspeed3, Ford Focus ST, and VW GTI, of course. In most respects, the new Mazda 3 maintains that performance edge; but it’s no great leap.

In powertrain performance, the redesigned 2014 Mazda 3 remains at the head of the class. Whether you get the 2.0-liter in-line four or the 2.5-liter version, and whether you opt for the six-speed automatic or the six-speed manual gearbox, these combinations all bring satisfying performance and better responsiveness than most compact cars.

The reason why these powertrains work so well? Through its so-called Skyactiv initiative, Mazda has gone and engineered, from scratch, a new engine (here in two different sizes), plus an all-new six-speed automatic transmission and a new six-speed manual gearbox. Along with the latest versions of the Mazda 6 mid-size sedan and CX-5 compact crossover, these models are all built on a purpose-built platform, to accommodate that new platform, and steering and suspension systems have been redesigned at the same time, all to preserve weight and improve fuel-efficiency, without sacrificing driving enjoyment.

The manual gearbox snicks neatly and precisely between gears, and the clutch takes up easily and neatly; and in automatic versions the transmission shifts quickly between gears, almost with the decisiveness of a dual-clutch system, but with more smoothness when you need it. The only odd thing we noticed in our test drive, when we encountered some low-speed hairpin corners, was how widely spaced first and second gear are. 3s versions get steering-wheel paddle-shifters.

Between 2.0-liter ‘i’ and 2.5-liter ‘s’ models, there’s probably not as much of a difference as you might think. The ‘i’ should be plenty quick for most needs, and it’ll save you a mile per gallon or two overall. Both of these engines have the same personality and are very smooth all the way up the rev range. The 2.5-liter has one big advantage, though: It makes its peak 185 pound-feet of torque at 3,250 rpm, while the 2.0-liter makes 150 lb-ft at 4,000; it feels noticeably stronger at the lower end of the rev range, which should make it an even better companion with the automatic transmission.

One note: Over two different test cars with the 2.5-liter engine, we encountered a noticeably lumpy low idle when the engine was fully hot.

In general drivability, the Mazda 3 also excels. The powertrain is never caught flat-footed, and the accelerator pedal is confident and linear, not just tuned for jumpy response on the test drive. The steering feels precise; there’s never excess body motion; and the four-wheel disc brakes (even on the base SV) are confidence-inspiring. Transmissions (except for the odd 1-2 gap we noticed in our automatic test car) offer a nice set of ratios that seem well-suited to the engine, including a very tall sixth gear that had the engine in our Grand Touring turning at an indicated 2,050 rpm at 70 mph.

And on the other hand, when you want to drive quickly, you can hit the Sport button for a more aggressive throttle setting and a delayed shifts for the automatic transmission. With it clicked, we also noticed that the stability control has a remarkably loose rein on overzealous driving styles; it’ll even permit a little bit of sliding—all in the name of fun, right?

One feature that's unusual in a new car is the bottom-hinged "organ-style" accelerator pedal, which Mazda says is more comfortable for drivers. We agree.

Mazda put lots of engineering into an electrohydraulic power steering system for that last-generation car, and nailed it, with the best steering, by a long shot, of any small car. That last-generation car is a tough act to follow, and we simply don’t think the new car’s electric power steering system is as good. It’s one of the better systems in this class, and we really like the strong sense of center at lower speeds, out of corners, but it doesn’t do well with oddly crowned roads, or track all that well at highway speeds—requiring more small adjustments than we would have liked.

In fuel efficiency, the Mazda 3 does make a significant leap. Although the 2.0-liter Skyactiv engine had been offered for the past couple of model years in some models of the 3, the 2014 models all have the new and far more efficient engine lineup. As we outline in our Green and Fuel Economy section, that means an EPA rating of more than 30 mpg Combined for the entire lineup--and mileage gains on the order of 30 percent for some of the lineup.

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2014 Mazda MAZDA3

Comfort & Quality

The 2014 Mazda 3 has the look and feel of a more expensive car inside, in many respects, but its low-slung seating and hunkered-back roofline bring some comfort consequences that some will have trouble accepting; so is its rather busy and noisy ride.

There’s no way to sugar-coat it: The long hood and swept-back proportions that make the 2014 Mazda 3 so attractive—even a little sexy—on the outside end up limiting its space (and usefulness) inside.

Although if you’re mainly planning to use the Mazda 3’s front seats, that might not matter; for the most part this compact-car family offers pleasing interior appointments, and even the look and feel of a premium-brand vehicle in some respects.

The third-generation Mazda 3 rides on a wheelbase that's 2.4 inches longer, but the five-door hatchback model is 1.8 inches shorter overall; it’s also about 1.6 inches wider than the previous model. While Mazda touts increased front and rear shoulder room, as well as better rear knee room, the net effect is that the cabin feels a bit smaller than most other cars in this class, especially in back.

The front seats are very comfortable and supportive, with lower cushions that are long enough for taller drivers; and the nice, contrasting perforated-leather upholstery in our Grand Touring felt luxury-caliber. Mazda has enlarged the cushion of the driver's seat and completely redesigned its front seat backs, to provide a more natural sitting position and increase lateral support.

In back, two six-footers will be able to get comfortable enough, provided those in front aren’t also tall. We’d also advise against the moonroof, because it brings a very odd, scooped-out headliner that will leave taller passengers feeling like the roof is bowing around them. Rear occupants sit almost two inches higher than in the old car, but the way the rising beltline limits window space still makes it one of the more claustrophobic small-car experiences—especially in the hatchback.

The Mazda 3 feels premium from the front seats forward, with materials that are major step forward for Mazda—even in some cases better than what’s offered in the new Mazda 6. But there are some disappointments as well; for instance, the interior surface alongside the front doors is soft touch, but alongside the rear doors it's a hard surface that mostly mimics the look but has a slightly different sheen and is just hard plastic (Mazda isn’t the only offender; it’s also done by Honda in the Civic, for instance). The headliner itself is another area of disheartening cheapness; in both top-of-the-line Grand Touring we spent time with, it felt like flimsy cardboard covered by a felt-like material, with the entire section a bit loose over the moonroof mechanism.

In theory, the Mazda 3 is a step ahead in refinement over the old car. The company says that it’s added noise-absorbing material behind the dash, under the floor mats, and elsewhere. While we didn’t hear a bit of road noise, and engine noise is in the background most of the time, we think that there’s a bit too much road noise whenever the surface is coarse or imperfect.

As for the ride, by current compact-car standards, it’s a bit busy (it would have been a bit ahead of the class norm a few model years ago, but loads of ride and refinement attention have transformed many on-a-budget offerings). You might call it ideal, but only if you've driven on smooth-surfaced Southern California roads. We still haven’t driven lower-level ‘i’ models with less aggressive wheels and tires, and we’ll update this impression when we have.

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2014 Mazda MAZDA3

Safety

The 2014 Mazda 3 earned Top Safety Pick+ status, and new active-safety options secure some added respect.

The all-new Mazda3 has an impressive list of standard features, plus some active-safety features that go beyond what's usually on offer in an affordable compact car; while that should place it in high regard, we're still waiting for a full set of crash-test ratings for this all-new model.

The 2014 Mazda 3 has been built on a different platform than the previous version—one that's mostly shared with the CX-5 crossover and the Mazda 6 mid-size sedan.

The 3 has been tested by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), and it's earned excellent 'good' results in all categories--including the new small overlap frontal test. And that's given it the new IIHS Top Safety Pick+ distinction for 2014. Furthermore, it's achieves top five-star ratings in all of the federal government's crash tests.

All Touring and Grand Touring models get Blind Spot Monitoring with Rear Cross Traffic Alert; 'i' Grand Touring (and 'i' Touring if optioned) as well as all 's' models get a rearview camera as part of their Mazda Connect system.

Other available active-safety features in the 3 include Smart City Brake Support, which will use laser sensors to help anticipate a collision and activate emergency braking automatically (under 19 mph); Forward Obstruction Warning, which warns the driver of hazards ahead (between 9 and 92 mph); a Lane Departure Warning System, which warns the driver when they're straying from lane markings; and Blind Spot Monitoring, which beeps if you've clicked the turn signal in one direction and a car is currently in that space. A High Beam Control system and Adaptive Front Lighting are also available.

With that optional equipment, the IIHS gives the Mazda 3 its 'advanced' front crash protection rating.

Outward visibility is surprisingly obscured in the Mazda 3, and even anticipating the upwardly curved beltline, it’s worse from inside than the exterior suggests. That’s in part because door pillars are thick, and rear hatchbacks with their blacked-out glass lead you to believe there’s window space where there’s not.

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2014 Mazda MAZDA3

Features

For the most part, the Mazda 3 is about on par with other vehicles in the segment; although if you step up to top Grand Touring models, you get a lot of tech features, at a price that’s still under $30k.

The 2014 Mazda 3 lineup includes a competitive list of features for the money—especially if you're considering one of the more affordable 'i' SV, Sport, or Touring models. Meanwhile, top-of-the-line Grand Touring models can be loaded up with some technology features that aren't typically found in this kind of affordable small car—and the bottom-line price doesn't add up to as much as you might think.

All models, even the base SV include push-button start, keyless entry, rear-seat heater ducts, tilt/telescopic steering, and power windows, locks, and mirrors. All but the base SV Sedan include a 60/40-split folding back seat (that model instead has a single-piece folding seat). The base SV Sedan also does without Bluetooth hand-free calling, but all other models include it. Lower-level models in the 3 lineup include a four-speaker sound system with an auxiliary input, while ‘i’ Sport models get a CD player.

Sport models step up to some pieces of equipment that many shoppers won't want to go without: a 60/40-split folding rear seat, cruise control, Bluetooth, a CD player, and power mirrors. The Touring models add alloy wheels, heated mirrors, a rear spoiler, keyless entry, a rear-seat armrest, premium sport seats, and some minor leather trim, as well as the Blind Spot Monitoring system with Rear Cross Traffic Alert.

Add that Touring Technology Package to the ‘i’ Touring, and you get a long list of items that are all included in the ‘s’ Touring and Grand Touring: dual-zone climate control, an overhead console, illuminated vanity mirrors, and the Mazda Connect system and all those audio, connectivity, and app extras.

Mazda3 'i' Grand Touring models get a long list of upgrades that include vinyl ('leatherette') upholstery, automatic climate control, a power driver's seat, a moonroof, and front heated seats—along with the Mazda Connect infotainment system, with a seven-inch color touch-screen display, the Commander Control, voice commands, navigation, a rearview camera, and SMS functionality plus full integration of Pandora, Stitcher, and Aha streaming audio with your smartphone connection. There’s also upgraded Bose nine-speaker audio, plus satellite radio and HD radio.

Step up to the 3 's' Touring and its larger 2.5-liter engine, and you also get the Active Driving Display (an odd head-up display with its own little screen), steering-wheel paddle-shifters, LED running lamps, halogen fog lamps, bi-xenon headlights, larger 18-inch alloy wheels, and a Sport mode button for automatic-transmission models. It's also worth noting that the Touring is the only way to get the larger engine without the moonroof.

At the top-of-the-lineup 's' Grand Touring level, you get perforated leather upholstery, the moonroof, bi-xenon headlamps with Adaptive Front Lighting, and rain-sensing wipers.

While base-level 'i' models and 'i' Sport trims get steel wheels, we're impressed that all models in the lineup get four-wheel disc brakes. But curiously, base SV models with the automatic transmission include a stripped-down version of the gauge cluster without a rev counter.

Adaptive Front Lighting and rain-sensing wipers are included in the 's' Grand Touring, while if you add the Technology Package you get a long list of additional active-safety features (detailed in the Safety section of this review)—plus the i-ELOOP system and active grille shutters, which together increase fuel-efficiency modestly.

The 2014 Mazda 3 features a completely new Mazda Connect infotainment system that connects via Bluetooth to the user's smartphone. Its software can also be updated, meaning features can be added in future without having to swap out physical hardware. And it uses the Aha system from Harman to handle Internet apps. Text-to-voice technology lets the system read e-mail and SMS messages aloud through the car's audio system, as well as displaying short messages on the touchscreen monitor. Users can select from among pre-set replies and have the system send them. The system will also read updates from Twitter and Facebook, and a Shout audio function lets users choose among responses.

A few words about the infotainment: While in the Mazda6 system has somewhat laggy screens and a poorly designed menu layout, the system in the Mazda3 is worlds better. The display is crisp, colorful, and high in contrast, and it’s quick and responsive, with no lag whatsoever. The layout of the menus is better, too, and you can either navigate through them on the touch screen or use the Command controller to twist down through them or click left or right to move amongst the tabs and screens.

Overall, we'd say that Mazda Connect is right on the mark, and most users are going to like its interface and its redundancy (with multiple ways to do most things). Our biggest complaint with some of the infotainment system is that it doesn't remember where we are… For instance if were listening to music and seeking through stations, a restart (or just answering a call) would lose our place and we'd have to go back in from the home screen. Also, you can't simply use the forward and back buttons on the steering wheel to tune (they appear to be for media only).

The navigation system is clear and straightforward, and we like the ease of point-of-interest (POI) integration. However, when we were moving along, it wouldn’t let us pan over to an alternate destination while we were using the map view—a function that you have in nearly every other system.

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2014 Mazda MAZDA3

Fuel Economy

With the entire lineup offering more than 30 mpg Combined, and the top-of-the-line Tech Package adding the fuel-saving i-ELOOP system, the 2014 Mazda 3 lineup shows that going frugal can still be fun.

The 2014 Mazda 3 has fuel economy ratings that are somewhat better than most cars in its class for base models, and significantly better than its competitive class if you opt for the higher-performance 's' model.

2014 Mazda 3 'i' models (with the 2.0-liter engine) return EPA ratings of 29 mpg city, 41 highway with the manual transmission, or 30/41 mpg with the automatic. Those are for the sedan; hatchback models lose 1 mpg on the highway. As for 's' models with the 2.5-liter engine, they're rated at 28/39 mpg for the Sedan and 27/37 for the hatchback. The top Grand Touring with the Tech package boosts the hatchback's mileage up to 28/38 mpg, however.

The Tech Package brings an i-ELOOP regenerative engine braking system and active grille shutters, along with several other active-safety extras. Simply put, i-ELOOP uses capacitors to run the alternator at its peak generation ability when decelerating and braking, to store energy that will then be used to run accessories (and run the alternator very lightly, with nearly no drag) when you're accelerating.

Both engines offer a very high (13:1) compression ratio, as well as direct injection and variable valve timing, and other measures that are aimed at saving fuel while maintaining responsiveness.

We managed more than 27 mpg over about 160 miles; and of that, about ten miles were crawling along in rush-hour gridlock and another 30 miles were driving very quick on mountain backroads, with the revs high. In relaxed daily commuting conditions you’ll easily top 30 mpg, we think, even with the larger 2.5-liter.

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November 20, 2016
2014 Mazda MAZDA3 5-Door HB Manual i Touring

I did research and this car proved to be everything positive that I read.

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Great gas mileage and performance. Great safety features for the price. I love that the shift gears appear in the gauges, so you'll always know what gear you're in. Comfortable seats that are heated, along... + More »
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May 29, 2015
For 2014 Mazda MAZDA3

Relialbility can't be beat.

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Starting with a '73 RX3 I've had 6 Mazdas including RX7, 323 GTX and Mazda 3. Practical yet fun. They run and run. Never had a Mazda leave me stranded.
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April 17, 2015
For 2014 Mazda MAZDA3

Mazda3...amazing little fun to drive car!

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Runs and handles well...slot of similarities to my past Miatas. Drove a friend to an airport about 90 miles away, and got 44.1 mpg at 72 mph. Pretty amazing! Mine has the 2.0 engine, which is great, but I... + More »
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April 13, 2015
For 2014 Mazda MAZDA3

Responsive, well-equipped, zippy, great looking car

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With only one exception, I like everything about the 2014 Mazda3 Hatch. It is a terrific looking car that is fun to drive and gets great fuel mileage, BUT it would be darn near perfect if the engineers at... + More »
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April 10, 2015
For 2014 Mazda MAZDA3

A pleasant car to drive with lots of features.

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After trying many cars, my choice stopped on the Mazda3 GT, for its driving, the sound system Bose, the pads shift, the speed HUD, the Bluetooth, the 2.5 liters, 184 HP, 18'' wheels...I would do the same... + More »
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