2010 Audi TT Review

Consumer Reviews
0 Reviews
2018
The Car Connection
2018
The Car Connection

The Car Connection Expert Review

Marty Padgett Marty Padgett Editorial Director
September 24, 2009

With its uprated edition and more muscular styling, the 2010 Audi TT edges closer to the border between sporty cars and true sports cars.

TheCarConnection.com has driven the Audi TT / TTS lineup of coupes and convertibles for this review of its safety, performance, styling, comfort, and quality. TheCarConnection.com's editors have also compiled a companion review that brings you a condensed look at opinions from other respected auto Web sites to help you in the research and buying process.

When Audi first introduced the TT coupe and convertible in 1999, its Art Deco-inspired style made a much deeper impression than its less impressive performance. With the 2008 redesign, Audi turned the tables; the TT's exterior style was muted to match more of the cues found on its other cars. The latest TT, basically unchanged for 2010, fits more with the new R8 thanks to its side sculpting, low nose, and LED detailing. The cockpit loses its grabby circular theme, and now faces the driver and passenger with a flight-inspired set of knobs, switches, and LCD screens bearing a distinctly masculine appeal. It's sleeker for sure, though less distinctive. Either as a TT or a TTS, there are two body style choices: coupe and roadster.

The 2010 TT returns with familiar engine, transmission, and drivetrain choices. The 200-horsepower, 2.0-liter turbo four-cylinder comes only with Audi's fantastic six-speed dual-clutch transmission, which eliminates the clutch pedal and lets twin interlocking transmissions handle blink-quick gearchanges. It's only offered with all-wheel drive. The previously available 250-hp V-6 version has been deleted. The four-cylinder engine gets good fuel economy, with EPA ratings of up to 23 mpg city, 31 highway. It's nimbler at handling than before, and the TT has the feel of a speedster-it's low to the ground and corners with flat but eager determination. The high-performance, 265-hp turbo TTS comes only with the dual-clutch transmission and all-wheel drive. It also upgrades to a magnetic ride suspension with standard and Sport settings-Sport mode lowers its ride by 0.39 inch-plus larger vented disc brakes and a tuned exhaust system. Audi claims the TTS can hit 62 mph in just 5.2 seconds and reach a top speed of 155 mph.

Review continues below

As you might expect, there's no extravagant space to be found inside, but the TT does have adequate foot and shoulder room for two, either in the coupe or the roadster. The console and glove box are on the tiny side, but the trunk space is more than roomy for a car of its size. The tight convertible top of the Audi TT is available with manual or power actuation, and it creates a quiet cruise when raised. The trunk space stays mostly intact, since the Audi's fabric roof doesn't require the folding space of a hardtop convertible. Audi's reputation for high-quality materials and fit and finish is evidenced in the TT's tight panel gaps and well-matched plastics.

Neither the NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) nor the IIHS (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety) has crash-tested the Audi TT. All models have standard hill-hold assist, anti-lock brakes, side airbags, and electronic stability control.

The Audi TT can be ordered in Premium, Premium Plus, or Prestige trim. All versions come well-equipped with Sirius Satellite Radio, cruise control, power features, and an auxiliary jack for audio players. Prestige models add a navigation system, rear parking assist, LED interior lighting, xenon headlamps, rain-sensing wipers, heated sport seats, a Bose premium sound system, and a trunk pass-through. An S-Line package dresses up the TT's appearance to look a bit like the TTS from a distance; the TTS has a Silk Nappa leather and Alcantara interior with aluminum trim.

8

2010 Audi TT

Styling

A fashion plate no more, the 2010 Audi TT has a sporting stance, contemporary details, and cool good looks.

Audi introduced the TT coupe and convertible in 1999, and its Art Deco-inspired style made a much deeper impression than its less impressive performance. In 2008 came a redesign-and with it, more muted, masculine lines and surfaces, more side sculpting, a lower nose, and LED detailing. Car and Driver labels the Audi TT as "unique among sports cars," and Edmunds.com says the TT has the "low-slung look and feel of a sports car." Kelley Blue Book admires the latest version's "crisper lines," while Motor Trend points out the TT is "no longer just a pretty boy."

With the 2008 redesign, the TT's cockpit loses its grabby circular theme, and now faces the driver and passenger with a flight-inspired set of knobs, switches, and LCD screens with a distinctly masculine appeal. It's sleeker for sure, though less distinctive. Cars.com likes the "aluminum interior trim," and Kelley Blue Book hails the "contemporary design, premium materials," which make it another addition to Audi's line of "standout interiors." Edmunds says the seat and steering wheel design give the "interior a sporty feel." The flat-bottomed steering wheel helps the driver get into and out of the car, but Kelley Blue Book reports that it "mostly just looks cool." The TTS gets a host of other improvements inside to match its dressed-up exterior, including "more brushed aluminum, gray-faced instruments whose white needles perform a fashionable flick before start-up, and handsome Alcantara-and-leather seats," according to Motor Trend.

Review continues below
8

2010 Audi TT

Performance

The 2010 Audi TT accelerates briskly and handles with great grip; the TTS sharpens its speed scalpel even more finely.

With the addition of the tuned TTS edition last year, the Audi TT lineup moved even closer to the sports car vein. It's essentially a carryover in performance features this year-and still a good choice for anyone seeking good power, deft handling, and all-weather traction.

The 200-horsepower, 2.0-liter turbo four-cylinder comes only with Audi's fantastic six-speed dual-clutch transmission, which eliminates the clutch pedal and lets twin interlocking transmissions handle blink-quick gearchanges. All-wheel drive is standard. It's nimbler at handling than before, and the TT has the feel of a speedster-it's low to the ground and corners with flat but eager determination. Kelley Blue Book enjoys the "lighter feel of the four-cylinder/front-drive combination" to other sports coupes and to the formerly available V-6 TT. The Washington Post points out the TT gets "23 in the city and 31 on the highway." The high-performance, 265-hp turbo TTS comes only with the dual-clutch transmission and all-wheel drive. Motor Trend raves about the power delivery from the more powerful 265-hp version of the 2.0T engine in the TTS, saying that it "can surf along on a wave of torque on the freeway, big power just a toe-flick away." They also praise its "real kick" for driving on twisty roads.

The TT's dual-clutch transmission finds many fans among other Web auto writers. Just like the editors at TheCarConnection.com, Kelley Blue Book feels the dual-clutch transmission is "truly revolutionary." AutoWeek pans the dual-clutch's shifting, saying that "upshifts come way too quickly"; they go on to gripe that "it's so slow on downshifts that you're forced to go down a couple gears manually with the paddles"-a surprising admission of sloth from an enthusiast magazine.

Handling also factors in the Audi TT's strong reviews. It's "akin to writing with the finest, most perfectly balanced pen," the Washington Post reports. "It feels that good in hand," Motor Trend finds it "easy to drive briskly," and Edmunds says the "steering is precise, although some drivers might find the rack devoid of feel." Of the ride, Consumer Reports remarks that the TT has "responsive but not overtly sporty handling." Kelley Blue Book attests the sports car "holds the road with a firm grip and minimal lean." Still, most car writers applaud the TT's smooth, quiet ride-though Motor Trend advises it's best to use the "normal" mode, since the magnetic suspension in the TTS' "Sport" mode "bobs and pitches with just a bit too much hyperactivity."

Review continues below
8

2010 Audi TT

Comfort & Quality

The 2010 Audi TT guarantees two comfortable seats and plenty of luggage space-any more, and you'll risk losing friends.

The 2010 Audi TT isn't known for much backseat room-in the roadster, there aren't any rear seats, in fact-but the high-quality cockpit and roomy trunk fit most reviewers and their luggage well, according to TheCarConnection.com's experts and other respected car-review Web sites.

As you might expect, there's no extravagant space to be found inside, but the TT does have adequate foot and shoulder room for two, either in the coupe or the roadster. Kelley Blue Book notes the new Audi TT is "wider and longer than original TT." Even so, Consumer Reports reminds shoppers that the "coupe has two small rear seats while the convertible seats just two." Most reviewers find enough seat room for adults up front; Kelley Blue Book reports the TT's racing-style flat-bottom steering wheel "provides a touch more leg clearance on entry and exit." In back, it's a more dismal scene for traveling companions;
Consumer Reports describes "two small rear seats," and Edmunds says "they're only suitable for kids." In another review, Edmunds pinpoints the coupe's rear seats as "only suitable for kids, packages or perhaps anorexic D-listers."

The console and glove box are on the tiny side, but the 2010 TT's trunk space is more than roomy for a car of its size in coupe or roadster body styles. Cars.com notes the "13.1-cubic-foot cargo space that grows to 24.7 cubic feet when the rear seats are lowered" and "can carry two golf bags." Edmunds calls the "coupe's hatchback utility" a strong point. With the roadster, Edmunds appreciates a folding top that "enables the car to retain clean lines with the top down" and "keep the car quiet and well-insulated."

Review continues below
8

2010 Audi TT

Safety

The 2010 Audi TT scores well for safety despite the lack of formal crash-test data.

The 2010 Audi TT retains a high safety score from the editors of TheCarConnection.com, though crash tests haven't yet been performed.

Neither NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) nor the IIHS (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety) has crash-tested the Audi TT. The car's safety rating from TheCarConnection.com's experts comes from strong crash performance across the Audi lineup, as well as a lengthy list of standard equipment.

Cars.com notes some of the TT's safety features include "side-impact airbags, side curtain airbags (coupe), antilock brakes, electronic stability system." Edmunds says a "hill-hold feature" is standard, and prevents rollback when paused on inclines.

Optional safety features, Kelley Blue Book says, include "backup sensors" and "Bi-xenon Adaptive Headlights."

Review continues below
9

2010 Audi TT

Features

The 2010 Audi TT tucks a wide range of standard and optional features into its admittedly hefty price tag.

The 2010 Audi TT comes in base or TTS form, and in Premium, Premium Plus, or Prestige trim.

All versions of the 2010 TT come well-equipped with Sirius Satellite Radio, cruise control, power features, and an auxiliary jack for audio players. Prestige models add a navigation system, rear parking assist, LED interior lighting, xenon headlamps, rain-sensing wipers, heated sport seats, a Bose premium sound system, and a trunk pass-through.

An S-Line package dresses up the TT's appearance to look a bit like the TTS from a distance; the TTS itself gets exterior add-ons, as well as a Silk Nappa leather and Alcantara interior with aluminum trim. Bluetooth is included on top trim levels.

On the TT roadster, the tight-fitting convertible top is available with manual or power actuation, and it creates a quiet cruise when raised. The Washington Post notes that the "power convertible roof rises or falls in seconds." When the soft top and side windows are raised, "it locks tightly in place, sealing out cold and moisture."

While its features list offers some of the latest technology, it doesn't come for free. Even with the generous levels of standard equipment, Edmunds considers the Audi "TT's price off-putting."

Review continues below
Continue Reading

The Car Connection Consumer Review

Rate and Review your car for The Car Connection! Tell us your own ratings for a vehicle you own. Rate your car on Performance, Safety, Features and more.
Write a Review
USED PRICE RANGE
$16,890 - $21,990
Browse Used Listings
in your area
8.2
Overall
Expert Rating
Rating breakdown on a scale of 1 to 10?
Styling 8
Performance 8
Comfort & Quality 8
Safety 8
Features 9
Fuel Economy N/A
Compare the 2010 Audi TT against the competition
Compare All Cars
Looking for a different year of the Audi TT?
Read reviews & get prices
Related Used Listings
Browse used listings in your area
See More Used