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Understanding Car Seat Ease-Of-Use Ratings


Car seats - proper installation-toddler, NHTSA

Parents today want convenience in products they buy, everything from toaster ovens to do-it-yourself home repairs. But when it comes to safeguarding children in cars, there can’t be any compromises. Safety has to come first.

There’s no denying that some car seats are easier to use than others. The question confronting parents is which ones are the easiest to use?

The good news for parents and caregivers is that there is a quick and handy guide for comparing car seats according to ease of use, the Ease-of-Use ratings through National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

Car seats - NHTSA ease of use ratings

What is the Ease-of-Use rating system?

Simply put, the NHTSA put together a five-star rating system for comparing ease of use in car seats currently sold in the U.S. The more stars that a particular make and model car seat has, the easier it is to use.

The NHTSA’s ratings take into account both how easily the car seat is installed and how easy it is for parents to secure the child, as well as how clear and readily understandable the instruction manual from the car seat manufacturer is.

It’s important to note that all car seats rated by the NHTSA meet federal safety standards and strict crash performance requirements. So, all of them are safe. How convenient they are, however, varies. Car seats differ in their ease of use in four categories:

  • Evaluation of instructions – This area examines the instruction manual for the child restraint in terms of content and clarity.
  • Evaluation of labels – In this category, the car seat labels are examined for content and clarity.
  • Vehicle installation features – This rating category examines how easy it is to use the features pertaining to installing the child restraint in the vehicle.
  • Securing the child – Finally, this category examines how easy it is to secure the child in the restraint in the vehicle.

Meaning of five-star ratings

Each of the above-named categories is evaluated according to a five-star rating system. The NHTSA’s ratings are:

  • Five stars means “excellent features on this child restraint for this category”
  • Four stars means “above average features”
  • Three stars means “average features”
  • Two stars means “below average features”
  • One star means “poor features”
  • N/A means the child restraint “does not contain any features that require a rating”

As for overall rating, a five-star overall rating generally means that the car seat’s labels and instruction manual is “extremely clear, concise, graphic.” The features for securing the child are “very convenient and simple to use.” Finally, such an overall rating means there are “excellent’ features for securing the restraint to the vehicle.

One star overall can be interpreted as the car seat having a “confusing, unclear, text-heavy” labeling and instruction manual. Parents and caregivers may find it difficult to use the features for installing the car seat in the vehicle and securing the child in the restraint.

Convertible car seats - The First Years TrueFit Recline

Type of car seats evaluated

The NHTSA Ease-of-Use database has searchable categories for car bed, infant, forward-facing, 3-in-1, convertible, combination, booster seat and all.

Interpreting Ease-of-Use ratings

The NHTSA recommends that parents and caregivers use the Ease-of-Use ratings to help them find a car seat that meets their needs. For those consumers who regularly use multiple vehicles, the best car seat choice may be one with the highest rating in the “vehicle installation features” category.

If, however, parents are very familiar with their child’s car seat or who rarely move a car seat from their vehicle, they may not find the “vehicle installation features” category as important as another category.

What about the LATCH system? Under the vehicle installation feature, the NHTSA Ease-of-Use program evaluates the child restraint both with belts and with the LATCH system.

Things to look for

Certain features are considered key for parents and caregivers when looking for a car seat.

A five-point safety harness – has straps (one for each shoulder, thigh, and one between the baby’s legs). The straps are more adjustable and more comfortable for the child than older designs.

Easy adjustments – As children grow, the car seat harness needs to be adjusted, so look for seats where this is easy to do. Look for car seats where the straps and harness height can be adjusted easily from the front. Some even have one-hand belt adjustments featuring quick-release buckles.

Easy-cleaning – Messes and spills are unavoidable, so look for car seats that have easy-cleaning fabrics and surfaces, such as a cover that can be detached and machine washed.

Side-impact protection – Manufacturers of some car seats have designed them with special energy-absorbing foam and other features that provide more protection for the child’s head and chest in the event of a side-impact crash.

Comfort – Don’t forget how comfortable the car seat is for the child. Look for a seat with good padding and plenty of head support.

What about car seat fit in vehicles?

The NHTSA Ease-of-Use ratings does not provide information on what car seats fit which vehicles, due to the various combinations of car seats, their fit in all vehicles, the timeliness and costs associated with being able to provide such “fit” information to consumers.

Parents and caregivers should contact the vehicle manufacturer to inquire if this type of information is available, as some automakers do provide it.

Most retailers selling car seats will allow parents and caregivers to test the installation in their vehicle before purchasing the car seat. In addition, installation assistance is available from thousands of child seat inspection stations across America.

MORE: car seat costs and car seat tips

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