2014 Infiniti Q50 Styling

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Styling

The 2014 Infiniti Q50 is a bit larger than the BMW 3-Series, Cadillac ATS, and Lexus IS, yet a bit smaller than the 5-Series, Cadillac CTS, or Jaguar XF. That said, its proportions manage to look more compact from a few paces back while surprising with more interior space and 'presence' up close.

Whether you see the exterior design as a somewhat more adventurous take on the M Sedan, or an especially curvaceous expansion of the former G37's handsome look, the new sheetmetal's just striking: the sensuality of the bigger Infiniti M sedan works in exotic new ways on the Q50, especially at the exaggerated intersection of curves and surfaces behind its rear doors. The boomerang brackets at the grille resemble the ones on the Lexus, but their hourglass shape is more at ease with the rest of the silhouette. We've seen dramatic cars that don't look so exciting a year later; but the Q50 isn't one of them.

The 2014 Q50 is more organic and unique than the G Sedan that precedes it.

We especially appreciate the creasing and surfacing, which add visual interest especially from any side angle. For instance a fender line continues along the side from the front, then fades around the A-pillar where another one starts. According to Infiniti, it's modeled after elements of nature, like waves. The Q50 is also lower than the G Sedan, yet two inches wider, which has an affect on the car's stance. The coefficient of drag is down to a low 0.26, while the double-arch grille in front and all-LED lighting details offer a combination of aggressive and smooth.

The interior's organized around a sweeping theme that cordons off the controls to the driver with an arc running down the console. The asymmetry helps keep the look a little sportier, a little more cockpit-like. It's dominated by what's sure to be the Q50's lightning rod for controversy: Infiniti InTouch, a twin-screen system that maps out the brand's place in the world of CUE and MyFord Touch, with a handful of redundant hard keys left behind. A large touchscreen displays frequently used functions from atop the dash, while a second touchscreen runs other infotainment and other systems on a separate pane below. For example, destinations are chosen on the lower screen, but display on the upper one. In effect, it's dual monitors--and an interesting choice that could reduce complexity, or increase it.

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