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2014 GMC Terrain Styling

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Styling

Art history hasn't looked favorably on Brutalism, the blocky, concrete-infused theme that defined early-1970s landscapes. But GMC has.

The HUMMER division is long gone, but it lives on in spirit, thanks to the GMC Terrain (and now, the 2014 Sierra). The angular, vaguely militaristic forms that outlined the H2 and H3 haven't missed a beat--they've just been wrapped in Transformers vinyl, like the smaller Chevy Sonic and Spark. The Terrain has zero tolerance for soft curves and easy transitions--it's all bluff, bolt upright, without a bow. It's easily as polarizing as the HUMMER lineup was in its day, but the Terrain seems to have evaded the unfortunate overt linkage to politics.

The GMC Terrain's latter-day HUMMER styling won't be loved everywhere, but its toned-down cabin will.
The box-car look is macho and wholly distinctive compared to its Chevrolet Equinox kin, but inside, the GMC Terrain defaults to corporate memes--and it's fine. It has a somewhat V-shaped center stack, housing audio and climate controls. The stack is flanked by large vertically oriented vents, and it's the centerpiece of the design. Other details and trim look chunky, with the same cloudy metallic surfaces that are now used inside other GMC vehicles.

The new Denali edition mutes some of the brighter details. The grille is mesh; the metallic trim is satin in texture. The cabin wears a soft pad on the dash, stitched with red thread, and the steering wheel has a section of dark woodgrain implanted across a top arc. Denali badges and a unique color palette are the only other details that separate it from the rank and file.

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