2014 Nissan GT-R Features

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Features

The 2014 Nissan GT-R is offered in three distinct models: Premium, Black Edition, and Track Edition.

It's no longer the screaming bargain it was in 2008 when it cost less than $70,000, but at $99,590, the standard GT-R Premium still is well-outfitted with all the gadgets its drivers will want--though the $109,300 Black Edition and the $115,710 Track Edition boast their own worthwhile features. All cars require a $1,000 destination charge.

Navigation, Bluetooth, and a luxurious new interior are nice, but the GT-R's price tag demands them.

Standard equipment on all versions includes a leather interior; power windows, locks and mirrors; a navigation system with real-time traffic and 3D mapping; Bose audio with Bluetooth streaming audio; and heated front seats.

We can't say enough about the optional, new, Premium Interior package; it slathers semi-aniline leather on the seats, instrument panel, shifter, steering wheel, doors, and armrests, and lifts the GT-R's cockpit out of the plasticky doldrums it otherwise inhabits. It's what the GT-R would wear if it also wore an Infiniti badge. It's also the only option offered, other than a Cold Weather Package, which wraps a special coolant mix with Dunlop all-season tires.

As for the other two models, the Black Edition wears 20-inch RAYS wheels with a black finish, and black paint; a carbon-fiber spoiler; and red-and-black Recaro seats and dark interior trim. The Track Edition dumps the GT-R's back seats altogether, replacing them with a lightweight quilted cloth mat; it gets its own suspension tuning, with higher spring rates, as well as brake cooling guides, a unique front spoiler with carbon-fiber air ducts, and a carbon-fiber rear spoiler for more downforce. Black six-spoke RAYS-forged wheels and Dunlop SP Sport Maxx GT 600 DSST CTT performance run-flats are standard.

The GT-R's videogame-style performance gauges are pretty much a feature in themselves. Tap the screen, and the GT-R reveals a set of digital gauges that let drivers record how they're performing, whether it's grip, acceleration, or elapsed times. It's customizable, too, and Nissan even hired designers who worked on Sony's Gran Turismo game to help render the interface. If it sounds gimmicky, it's not--it's an apt piece of tech for a car so Corvette-fryingly capable.

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