2013 Toyota Sequoia Comfort & Quality

7.0
Comfort & Quality

The 2013 Toyota Sequoia isn't only a truck. With seating for eight and interior appointments that can look and feel quite upscale, this is a vehicle that can also work for the family--provided you don't expect quite the same level of space-efficiency, versatility, and comfort of some of crossover utility vehicle designs--including Toyota's own Highlander, which is quite a bit smaller on the outside but can feels nearly as large (or more so) inside.

In the first two rows adults will have no problem accommodating even taller adults, and the second row in particular has long doors that make getting in and out easier--although the Sequoia requires a step up. Separately, dual captain's chairs are offered in back, reducing the capacity to seven. Front seats are wide and soft, and they don't provide much if any side support--although we don't anticipate you'll be doing around corners quickly.

The Sequoia isn't quite as space-efficient as large crossovers; materials and switchgear could be better for the price, too.

The third row is only good for kids or small adults, and it's tougher to get back there--you're not left much legroom and the seating position is too low--although the second row slides forward (or back) 5.9 inches for easier access, or more legroom.

Both the second- and third-row seatbacks can be folded forward to a flat cargo floor, with the second row split in three portions (40/20/40) and the third row in two (60/40). Storage space is ample once the third-row seats are folded in place, which is made easy thanks to a power-folding option. A power tailgate is also included on Limited and Platinum grades, and the rear tailgate glass can be operated separately.

The Sequoia isn't quite a luxury vehicle, but it's a thoughtful, well-built one, with plenty of amenities such as cupholders and small bins, and--for families with young kids--materials that are easy to keep clean. Although some of the materials and switchgear carry straight over from the Sequoia, feeling a little cheap here in what's, for the most part, a more expensive vehicle.

Build quality and panel gaps, like on most Toyotas, are near the top-end of the class. Our only gripe is that many of the dials and switchgear carry over from the Tundra pickup, which may be fine for a workhorse but feel a little cheap in the Sequoia. The matte-metallic plastic trim on most of the dash may not sit well with everyone, but items like the heated seats, steering wheel controls, and power tilt/slide moonroof help make up for this.

Ride quality is good for a body-on-frame truck, thanks to the independent rear suspension system--with the ride even a step more composed with the active variable air suspension (AVS) system in the Platinum model. Road and wind noise feel quite well sealed-away, too. That said, if towing and off-road ability aren't priorities, you're simply going to get a more composed on-the-road experience with a model like the Ford Flex, Chevrolet Traverse, or even the Highlander.

Research Other Topics

7.4
on a scale of 1 to 10
Styling
7.0
Expert Rating
Performance
8.0
Expert Rating
Comfort & Quality
7.0
Expert Rating
Safety
7.0
Expert Rating
Features
8.0
Expert Rating
Fuel Economy
4.0
Expert Rating
Looking for other models of the Toyota Sequoia?
Read reviews & get prices
Compare the 2013 Toyota Sequoia against the competition
Compare All Cars