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2012 Mercedes-Benz SLK Class Photo
8.0
/ 10
On Styling
BASE INVOICE
$39,525
BASE MSRP
$42,500
On Styling
Our favorite view of the new SLK? From the cockpit, of course.
8.0 out of 10
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STYLING | 8 out of 10

Expert Quotes:

The SLK's new look is heavily influenced by the bigger SL roadster, not to mention the SLS AMG gullwing and even the new 2012 CLS four-door. It's compact and stubbier, which shows up clearly in its nose, but the careful attention paid to omitting extra lines and sculpting surfaces gives the SLK its own grace, mostly from the rear three-quarters.
Motor Authority

The new interior is a welcome departure from that of the last SLK. Gone is shiny-plastic, generic switchgear; in its place is what appears to be a scale model of the SLS dashboard.
Car and Driver

The SLK's newly aggressive road presence is dominated by a large three-pointed star leading the way from the middle of the wide upright radiator grille split by a horizontal chrome blade.
Automobile

As the new SLK's interior design closely mimics that of the Mercedes SLS, owners of the range-topping supercar may be a little miffed that their car essentially shares the same cabin with Benz's cheapest sports car.
Edmunds

The split-grill design reconstitutes the 190 SL's design from the late 1950s in a handsome, modern manner.
Autoblog

Mercedes-Benz penned the first SLK with a mission in mind. However you want to couch the language, it was a pure appeal to women drivers, with its minimally detailed body, its lightness and lack of aggression, and above all, its four-seasons folding hardtop.

The second time around the block, the SLK grew far more masculine, its dash studded with techy buttons and its nose dipped low. It changed the car's appeal, and that's the thread the third-generation SLK picks up as it refines the basic look and adapts it to new regulations.

It's difficult to draw elegant cars on such a short wheelbase. It's also a challenge to meet new European pedestrian-safety laws that require much taller front ends. The SLK somehow manages to carve out some elegance from that restricted canvas, with details cribbed from the SLS AMG gullwing and some other styling cues foretelling next year's new SL Class lineup. We've grown happier with the look since we first saw it: it's a vast improvement over the under-detailed first-gen SLK, and the overdetailed second-generation car. There's no denying the massive front end, though--it's tall, and the horizontal grille establishes a new brand identity, but looks blunt and square, where the rest of the car softly tapers to a conclusion. The roof blisters over the body's wedge in a bare little bubble, same as ever, and tapers off into teardrop taillamps that create the most cohesive view--the one from behind. It's best when the roof is tucked in and the metallic twin peaks of the seat backs stand up at attention.

The cockpit's lost most of the metallic studded buttons that confused drivers, but it's traded them for more conventional black switches that still need to be learned before that first long road trip. The center stack reverts to a softly rounded, aluminum-clad look, capped by an LCD screen for audio displays. The screen goes high-resolution in vehicles equipped with COMAND, the wheel-driven controller that rests just under the driver's right wrist. Meaty metallic ribs flare from the flat-bottomed steering wheel, which has its own set of buttons for secondary controls like voice, audio and navigation, and metallic tubes house clean analog gauges remixed with some LCD readouts for the usual trip and gear functions.

Conclusion

Our favorite view of the new SLK? From the cockpit, of course.

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