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2010 Hyundai Accent Photo
6.0
/ 10
On Features
BASE INVOICE
$9,872
BASE MSRP
$9,970
On Features
The 2010 Hyundai Accent isn't as strong a value as its larger Elantra and Sonata siblings, but if you're willing to forgo basics like air conditioning, you could have a new car for not much more than $10,000.
6.0 out of 10
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FEATURES | 6 out of 10

Expert Quotes:

unusual availability of accessories
Kelley Blue Book

[base model] "doesn't have a CD player, so be prepared to warble your own tunes
Edmunds

The 2010 Accent comes with quite a range of equipment; the three-door hatchback is offered in Blue, GS, and SE trims, while the sedan is available in a single GLS model. On the base Blue, you won't find much standard. There's no air conditioning and no power accessories, and most popular features are only available on the other trims. Outfitted with fog lights, a CD player, XM Satellite Radio, and tire pressure monitors, a 2009 Hyundai Accent SE stickers in the $15,000 range.

The base Blue model, which starts at less than $10,000, can now be optioned with air conditioning. It includes taller transmission ratios for better fuel economy to appeal to the most miserly drivers, but otherwise comes sparsely equipped—there's no audio system, air conditioning, or power accessories. The GS hatch gets tilt steering and air conditioning, while the top SE model is the way to go for those who want a truly well-stocked car; it includes a sunroof, a sport-tuned suspension, an upgraded six-speaker sound system with iPod and USB inputs, steering-wheel audio controls, power accessories, keyless entry, 16-inch alloy wheels, and fog lamps.

The GLS sedan includes many of those features. Cars.com clarifies, "The GLS sedan has optional 15-inch alloy wheels, while the SE hatchback has 16-inch alloys and a sport-tuned suspension."

For 2010, all SE models now include what was previously considered the Premium Package—bringing cruise control and a sunroof.

Cars.com isn't so convinced about the Accent's value for money. The reviewer emphasizes that the base Accent doesn't include much, while their test SE model, coming in at $15,790, costs more than a base Honda Fit, which includes nearly all the same equipment.

Conclusion

The 2010 Hyundai Accent isn't as strong a value as its larger Elantra and Sonata siblings, but if you're willing to forgo basics like air conditioning, you could have a new car for not much more than $10,000.

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