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2010 Dodge Viper SRT Comfort & Quality

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While its numbers are amazing, the Viper isn't as much of a thrill to drive in traffic on the daily commute. It's uncomfortable, cramped, noisy, and poorly ventilated even with the roadster's top lowered, and it demands constant attention.

Edmunds understates the Viper's "small cockpit," while ConsumerGuide warns that the "cabin is cramped for tall occupants," but Kelley Blue Book appreciates that the Dodge Viper coupe's bubble roof means "even when the driver is wearing a helmet the Coupe still offers plenty of headroom." Car and Driver puts it bluntly when describing the bucket seats as "plain annoying, being too heavily bolstered and too long under your thighs." The vested hometown interests at the Detroit News disagree: "you'll feel your body conform to the racing seat," they gush, while adding the seat's "bolsters hold you snugly in a friendly embrace."

The 2010 Dodge Viper puts performance first; passengers are merely highly evolved carry-on luggage.

It's just a two-seater, yet entry and exit with the Viper has its own difficulties. The Detroit News points out the Viper's door sills hide its exhaust pipes, raising the temperature, and brushing against them isn't a good idea. "You wondered whether you were going to burn yourself," they ask, though they add the latest Viper's sills only get "toasty warm," as opposed to the "grilling temperature" of previous editions. Cars.com underscores the problem: "another of the Viper's charms is side sills that get hot enough to burn you, due to the exhaust pipes that run through them." The reviewer cautions, "I'd be careful if wearing shorts."

In back, reviewers discover a little more storage space than expected. Cars.com reports the "trunk isn't bad at all; it's large enough for golf clubs." ConsumerGuide finds "a few soft bags fit in the convertible's trunk," but moans that the "cabin storage is limited to a small center console and dashboard glovebox."

Build quality seems fine, but as mentioned before, material quality is a whole other matter in the Viper. The Detroit News says the interior is "more refined," but there's "still room for improvement." Edmunds agrees, noting the "cockpit is still rather blasé for a car whose price comes very close to $90K." ConsumerGuide absurdly suggests the Viper has "rich upholstery," but comes back to earth in noting the "cabin's only relief from hard matte plastic and textured vinyl are some metal trim pieces."

The most pressing concern for drivers, if they're not racing, is the ever-present din. It's a noisy ride, and the sounds aren't as well-tuned as those in other supercars. Car and Driver says that the Dodge Viper's engine note "trails those of Ferraris, Porsches, Lamborghinis, and Z06s in aural excitement." Consumer Guide adds "wind and road noise are always present," and "even mild throttle application triggers an intrusive roar from the side exhaust outlets."

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