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2010 Hyundai Tucson Photo
7.0
/ 10
On Quality
BASE INVOICE
$18,296
BASE MSRP
$18,995
On Quality
The 2010 Hyundai Tucson makes tremendous progress on interior space and quality, though it's still a smaller offering in its class.
7.0 out of 10
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QUALITY | 7 out of 10

Expert Quotes:

interior "larger than that of a BMW X3
Edmunds

Tall drivers "may find the driver's seat cramped
Cars.com

rear seats might even be better than those in the front
Autoblog

cargo space is some 40% shy of main rivals
USA Today

quality is competitive
Cars.com

It's not as spacious as most of its rivals, but the less expensive 2010 Hyundai Tucson scores with reviewers from TheCarConnection.com and around the Web for its adult-sized seats and vastly better fit and finish.

At 173.2 inches long, 71.7 inches wide, and 66.3 inches tall, the 2010 Hyundai Tucson has a longer wheelbase and is wider than the Honda CR-V, Ford Escape, and Subaru Forester. And while it offers more interior room than the Nissan Rogue and Ford Escape, the Tucson has slightly less interior and cargo room than the Honda CR-V, and is significantly smaller inside than the Toyota RAV4-though Hyundai points out it offers more interior room than a BMW X3 or an Acura RDX. In all, there are 101.9 cubic feet of passenger space; 25.7 cubic feet lie behind the rear seat, and when it's folded down, the Tucson offers 55.8 cubic feet of cargo room, USA Today notes. Cars.com says that makes the 2010 Tucson "small"-rightfully so, since they also note the Tucson is shorter than a Ford Escape and "at least 6 inches shorter than a CR-V or Toyota RAV4." Still, the interior space is "larger than that of a BMW X3," Edmunds points out, while Motor Trend says "the cabin is roomier and is now more in line with the space provided by its competition."

Editors at TheCarConnection.com find the Tucson's front seat space very good with plenty of legroom, but the leather seats fitted to some test cars have a sloping bottom cushion that grows uncomfortable quickly. Automobile calls the front seats "comfortable," though Cars.com feels "drivers around 6 feet tall may find the driver's seat cramped," due to their impression of limited seat travel.

In the back, plenty of room for adults is available-"you'd think you were in a midsize machine," USA Today declares, "especially back-benchers." It's clear the Tucson's cloth seats are better choices than the leather-clad ones, since the cloth seats have longer bottom cushions. USA Today reports the backseat "doesn't slide fore-aft, as rivals' do," and Cars.com notes "some adjustability would be welcome," though it adds the "rear seats offer decent headroom and adequate legroom." Car and Driver observes the "rear bench sits high off the floor and offers enough legroom and knee clearance to allow a six-footer to sit behind himself." Autoblog likes the rear seats best: "The rear seats might even be better than those in the front, reminding us of the Infiniti FX's rear quarters - a compliment, to be sure."

Cargo room is large enough for medium-size pets, a significant amount of luggage, or enough groceries for a family of four for a week, though the Toyota RAV4 offers enough volume for a third-row seat. The cargo space "ranks near the bottom of the class," Cars.com points out, while USA Today observes it's "some 40% shy of main rivals'." Interior storage is well planned inside the Tucson, with cubbies and bottle holders in the console and door panels, as well as a deep glove box up front.

In TheCarConnection.com's experience, the fit and finish of prototype Tucson test vehicles was generally good-a vast improvement over the previous Tucson-though hard plastic is the rule of the cabin trim, not the exception. It "seemed more refined," USA Today observes, while Cars.com takes note of the "consistent, low-gloss appearance for most of the plastics within immediate view." Car and Driver says "the interior is even better" than the competition and feels "Hyundai is becoming the one to watch on interior quality at this price level." However, Autoblog sees "plenty of ticky tack plastic covering wide expanses." The 2010 Tucson seems reasonably quiet to most reviewers, with "some road noise," Motor Trend observes. But "when cruising, the Tucson is surprisingly quiet," Automobile asserts, and in part, that's the result of a "tight, vibration and body-movement free vehicle," Autoblog explains.

Conclusion

The 2010 Hyundai Tucson makes tremendous progress on interior space and quality, though it's still a smaller offering in its class.

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