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2008 Lincoln Town Car Photo
7.0
/ 10
On Quality
BASE
INVOICE
$41,626
BASE
MSRP
$45,295
On Quality
The 2008 Lincoln Town Car’s notion of comfort and quality may be obsolete, but the interior space can’t be denied.
7.0 out of 10
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QUALITY | 7 out of 10

Expert Quotes:

cushy ride, quiet at speed
Car and Driver

rear bench isn't as sofa-comfortable as it looks
ConsumerGuide

Seats are La-Z-Boy comfy without any side-pinching lateral support
Edmunds

TheCarConnection.com researched reviews around the Web for opinions on the 2008 Lincoln Town Car's comfort levels. Editors also drove the Town Car—and were ferried around in the backseats of many Town Cars in airports around the world. Most reviews, and TheCarConnection.com’s editorial experience, find plenty of room inside the car but not much in the way of supportive seating or high-end luxury fittings.

The first thing you notice about the 2008 Lincoln Town Car's interior, according to Edmunds, is its sheer magnitude. Its "generous interior" will seat six full-grown adults in relative comfort. This source uses some nautical adjectives in its description of the Town Car Lincoln's ride. On one hand, under Pros and Cons, Edmunds puts "nautical ride" in the Cons column; on the other hand, the reviewer says that the Lincoln Town Car is "comfortable, in an on-the-high-seas sort of way," adding that seats are "La-Z-Boy comfy without any of that side-pinching lateral support." Cars.com reports that "interior space is abundant, and rear legroom in the extended-length L sedan is massive...seat bottoms are fairly long and well cushioned," but adds that "support could be better."

ConsumerGuide says that with the Town Car, Lincoln earns above-average marks for comfort, but cautions that, in front, the "middle rider must straddle transmission hump" (this is the last of the rear-wheel-drive luxury cars, after all), and the rear row "isn't as sofa-comfortable as it looks." Nonetheless, there is "abundant head room and outboard leg room."

Trunk space is "massive," according to Edmunds, furnishing 21 cubic feet of storage space. Car and Driver reports that the Lincoln Town Car's trunk "can swallow enough golf clubs to supply the tour or enough bodies to ensure an acquittal." The downside to the trunk's nearly bottomless depth is that it makes moving heavy objects around dangerous for one's chiropractic health.

As for fit and finish, "materials approach those of some costlier import-brand rivals," says ConsumerGuide, and Cars.com advises potential buyers that the material used for seats isn't just your run-of-the-mill leather; the Lincoln Town Car features "seats...trimmed in premium leather." As one would expect in a stately car of this type, excessive road noise is not on the menu. ConsumerGuide reports that the power plant is "muted even at full throttle" and that they noticed tire thrum "only on very coarse pavement." They add that "wind rush rises above 60 mph, but doesn't intrude."

Conclusion

The 2008 Lincoln Town Car’s notion of comfort and quality may be obsolete, but the interior space can’t be denied.

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7.4
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TCC Rating
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