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2008 Mazda CX-7 Photo
6.0
/ 10
On Quality
BASE INVOICE
$22,225
BASE MSRP
$23,750
On Quality
The 2008 Mazda CX-7 seems to have an identity crisis; it purports to be a utility vehicle, but its sporty design compromises rear passenger comfort and cargo capacity.
6.0 out of 10
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QUALITY | 6 out of 10

Expert Quotes:

Rear legroom is a little less than its main competitors
Edmunds

Taller folks might want more head clearance
ConsumerGuide

a light-effort liftgate
Car and Driver

This 2008 Mazda is best suited for couples who occasionally transport guests or cargo; as a family hauler, its limited legroom and headroom won't win many fans.

Most reviews read by TheCarConnection.com like the Mazda CX-7's front passenger space and comfort but feel the second row is too tight for adults. After a long road trip, Car and Driver finds "everyone appreciated the Mazda's comfortable front seats," but "space in the fixed second row was often tight, particularly for riders over six feet [tall]." Thankfully, for backseat riders of this Mazda, 2008 CX-7s have a wide body that "provides plenty of hiproom...for those times when all five seats need to be occupied," says Edmunds. Not only is legroom tight in back due to the swooping styling, headroom suffers as well. ConsumerGuide warns "taller folks might want more head clearance." Even shorter folks may take issue with the 2008 Mazda CX-7, they note, as the "high-ride stance makes step-in a bit steep" and "disappointingly [the steering wheel] is not telescopic."

One of the reasons for buying a crossover is cargo capability, and yet, according to Edmunds, the 2008 Mazda CX-7's luggage capacity "trails most of its competitors...with more than 10 cubic feet less capacity than the RAV4 and CR-V" at 58.6 cubic feet maximum. Cars.com likes the little touches such as the carpeted cargo floor that can be "flipped over to reveal a hard plastic one instead" and the folding rear seats that "provide a nearly flat load floor when down." Car and Driver states, "It's far easier to get a bike inside the CX-7 than in an Escalade."

Quality of materials and assembly are mostly good in this Mazda; 2008 CX-7s in reviews read by TheCarConnection.com variously exhibited good build quality but poor finishing details. For example, Edmunds calls build quality "very good [with] spot-on ergonomics," but ConsumerGuide is "let down by a few budget-grade plastics and unconvincing silver paint that passes for metal accents" and notes further, "One model tested suffered from a dashboard rattle when going over rippled pavement."

Noise-wise in the 2008 Mazda, Consumer Guide notes that "engine and wind noise are modest in routine cruising," and most of it comes from "coarse-surface tire hum."

Conclusion

The 2008 Mazda CX-7 seems to have an identity crisis; it purports to be a utility vehicle, but its sporty design compromises rear passenger comfort and cargo capacity.

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