2008 Audi TT Performance

8.0
Performance

TheCarConnection.com notes that the 2008 Audi TT's performance pleases almost everyone who gets behind the wheel.

The Audi TT’s base engine is a 2.0-liter four-cylinder with 200 hp and, according to Car and Driver, the capability of taking the car from 0-60 in a little over 6 seconds when matched to the S tronic dual-clutch transmission. Interestingly, the optional V-6, while adding 50 horses under the hood, only gains a second in the 0-60 sprint--but is substantially thirstier, getting only about 21-24 mpg on the open highway compared to the four cylinder's 28-31 mpg--and costs more as well. The four-cylinder powerplant was preferred by Forbes Auto, which says that in "most real-world situations, it feels nearly as quick as the V-6."

The 2008 Audi TT isn’t a pure sportscar, but it has good acceleration, a trick transmission, sharp handling, and a good ride—plus good four-cylinder fuel economy.

The 2008 Audi TT is available with either a six-speed S tronic dual-clutch transmission or on the V-6, a six-speed manual. Kelley Blue Book said that the more time they spend with the latter, the "more archaic the old pedal-and-lever system feels." The S tronic system—which is effectively two transmissions in one and produces quick, smooth shifts—is a favorite of the editors at TheCarConnection.com.
Four-cylinder cars come with front-wheel drive, while V-6 cars offer Audi’s quattro all-wheel drive.

Automobile describes the Audi TT for 2008 as an "Atari Car"--an auto that feels like a video game to the driver. It is among those cars that "are just as fun to drive at 15 mph through a school zone as they are to blast down back roads." They add that the Audi's capabilities "become more profound the harder you push it." Cars.com also likes the Audi TT’s handling, with a catch: “When driven aggressively on the track, the TT feels like the same car in good ways…the steering feedback is improved, but there's still something missing compared to its rear-drive competitors.” And the New York Times points out the weakness of the Audi’s nose-heavy weight distribution: “on the tight turns, like hairpins, that the TT becomes less fun and shows its weak point. It begins feeling nose-heavy and less willing to change direction, reminding the driver that about 59 percent of its weight is up front, far from the ideal 50-50 balance.”

The 2008 Audi TT is helped along by a new electromagnetic suspension that’s available as an option. By using electrical currents to change the stiffness of shocks through magnetism, the Audi TT can adapt its rides to the conditions of the road. According to Motor Week, the Audi TT's adjustable suspension allows the occupants to have both a smooth ride and good reflexes; its "handling prowess does not come at the expense of ride quality." That softer ride makes the 2008 Audi TT perfect for a long road trip, remaining comfortable over rough road surfaces according to the New York Times: "It is not one of those rough-riding, tiring sports cars no good for anything more than an afternoon romp.”

Motor Week reports that the brakes of the Audi TT are solid; the anti-lock system brings the vehicle to a complete stop from 60 mph in an average of 123 feet on a dry road surface.

Research Other Topics

8.2
on a scale of 1 to 10
Styling
8.0
Expert Rating
Performance
8.0
Expert Rating
Comfort & Quality
8.0
Expert Rating
Safety
8.0
Expert Rating
Features
9.0
Expert Rating