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2011 Toyota Sienna Photo
9.0
/ 10
On Quality
BASE INVOICE
$23,431
BASE MSRP
$25,060
On Quality
There's vast interior space and available business-class seats, but the Sienna doesn't have a fold-away second row.
9.0 out of 10
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QUALITY | 9 out of 10

Expert Quotes:

Toyota now offers a Lounge Seating package on Limited models that features two ottoman equipped recliners -- similar to the rear thrones in the $408,000 Maybach 62.
Autoblog

Toyota achieves this by adding an impossibly narrow seat (think celery stalk) that can be wedged between the two captain's chairs in the middle row.
Los Angeles Times

Third-row space and comfort are also good enough for adults, as long as the second-row occupants don’t slide their seats all the way back.
Car and Driver

Interior plastics are pleasing to the eye, but touching them reveals a hard and slightly cheap-feeling texture.
Car and Driver

in order to package all those features for a less-than-heart-attack-inducing price, Toyota sacrificed on some of the interior materials and soundproofing.
MotherProof

The new 2011 Sienna is 200.2 inches long, with a 119.3-inch wheelbase and an overall width of 78.2 inches, with a couple of inches more in interior room. Yep, it's big.

There's ample space everywhere for adults, even in the third-row seat. Front passengers have a regal view of the road ahead, and plenty of headroom, legroom and knee room. In the second row, you'll find either a bench or twin bucket seats that also have copious room--and the seat(s) slide on an elongated track that gives the second row limo-like leg room, or no legroom while third-row passengers are loaded.

The second-row seats can be removed, but there's no new floorpan in the Sienna, which means no in-floor storage or fold-away seats as in the Chrysler minivans or the Nissan Quest. Second-row aircraft-style "lounge" seats can also be ordered; they have leg-cushion extenders and footrests that give new status to backseat drivers.

The third-row seat actually has adult-sized room in all directions. It isn't that difficult to enter-and they fold almost flat into a deep well in the cargo area. With the second-row seats moved as far front as possible, the 2011 Sienna has 117.8 cubic feet of cargo room; with the second row removed and the third row folded, it will hold 150 cubic feet of cargo. Even behind the upright third-row seat, there's 39.1 cubic feet of space, almost twice as much storage room as the 2010 Ford Taurus' trunk. The Sienna also can carry an actual 4x8 sheet of plywood.

There's also plenty of small-item storage inside in the Sienna's console, twin gloveboxes, map and side pockets, and available cargo organizer.

The revamped interior suffers a bit in richness; interior materials and appointments feel a bit less refined compared to those of its competitors, in particular the horizontal grain on the dash and door caps. You won't open a vein, but you will notice a difference if you compare it to Aunt Barb's '96 Camry.

Conclusion

There's vast interior space and available business-class seats, but the Sienna doesn't have a fold-away second row.

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