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2010 Chrysler Sebring Photo
5.0
/ 10
On Styling
BASE INVOICE
$19,405
BASE MSRP
$20,120
On Styling
Although it’s not ugly, the 2010 Chrysler Sebring has an interior that isn’t particularly inviting and an exterior that’s downright ungainly in the Convertible.  
5.0 out of 10
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Whether in sedan or Convertible form, the 2010 Chrysler Sebring isn’t very responsive or satisfying to drive. Steering is direct but not at all razor-sharp, and the independent suspension is firm enough to be safe in emergency maneuvers but not at all sporty. The Convertible feels a step sloppier. Overall, the ride tends toward the absorbent side, though it’s also a bit pitchy.

The 2010 Chrysler Sebring will likely continue its appearance asremain a favorite in rental fleets, because its interior is actually find foraccommodates four adults—if you’re willing to lwedge yourself through a narrow opening. The sedan also has a reasonably roomy, comfortable interior, with enough space for adults in back. The plasticky interior is not wonderful to touch, but the controls are laid out logically. In the sedan, the backseats fold forward and open up to the trunk; the front passenger seat also folds flat for loading long objects inside the car.

Several different top configurations are offered on the Convertible. Base LX models get a vinyl top, which basically does what it needs to do—keep the elements outside and the cabin fairly quiet—but from the outside it looks unattractive, compared with the nicely stitched fabric top offered on midlevel Sebring Convertibles. The three-piece hardtop, engineered by Germany's Karmann, arguably cleans up the Sebring Convertible’s lines, but editors find the car’s lines already to be among the least attractive of convertibles on the market.

The Chrysler Sebring gets mostly five-star ratings from the government for crash protection;, and it now getsearns top ‘"good"’ scores in every major category from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), thanks to a new whiplash-averting front-seat design. That makes the sedan an IIHS Top Safety Pick for ’10, although electronic stability control isn’t a standard feature—it’s a stand-alone $425 option.

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