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The 10 States Most (And Least) Likely To Buy "American"

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Americans have conflicting ideas about what makes a car truly "American". According to an AutoTrader survey released last year, "a vehicle that is made in the U.S. by a foreign automaker is more likely to be seen as 'American made' (57 percent) than one from a U.S. automaker that was built outside the U.S. (43 percent)". 

But that doesn't mean that Americans have given up on Detroit entirely. In fact, TrueCar says that in 18 states, at least 50 percent of new vehicles sold are manufactured by Chrysler, Ford, or General Motors. 

TrueCar's Jesse Toprak says that "Despite Asian and European automakers having a number of factories in the U.S., many Americans still have strong loyalty to the brands they view as 'domestic'". As some might expect, those bastions of loyalty tend to be situated in the center of the country, an area generally considered more conservative than the East and West Coasts.

No prizes for guessing the state where residents are most likely to buy cars from U.S. automakers: that would be Michigan, where 79.2 percent of all new vehicles sold are built by the Big Three. 

Overall, the top five states for Detroit-lovers are:

1. Michigan: 79.2%

2. North Dakota: 68.1%

3. South Dakota: 65.6%

4. Iowa: 63.2%

5. Wyoming: 62.6%

At the other end of the scale, we find far less affinity for the Big Three. In fact, Chrysler, Ford, and GM account for less than 30 percent of sales in all five of the "least American" states (including Washington, D.C.):

47. Massachusetts: 25.8%

48. Connecticut: 25.8%

49. California: 22.9%

50. District of Columbia: 22.6%

51. Hawaii: 19.4% 

While these are some very interesting stats, they don't tell the full story. As we mentioned above, what counts as an "American" car these days is a matter for serious debate.

Last week, for example, we revealed that the Ford F-150 is the most "American" vehicle in the country, based on the origin of its parts, its place of assembly, and its popularity with U.S. shoppers. However, the top-ten list of "American" cars is evenly split between U.S. and Asian brands, and Toyota has more vehicles on it than any other automaker. 

So, let's ask again: which is more important to you, the company that made your car or the country where it was built?

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Comments (12)
  1. For me, it it the Company that made the car.
     
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  2. You feel that way even if Chysler is largely owed by Fiat and General Motors is owned by the Government and the UAW?
     
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  3. Where do the profits go? I have no interest in supporting the Tokyo economy where Toyota's health car costs are zero. My wife drives a Ford. I drive a Dodge (at the time I bought my car, Chrysler was still American owned).
     
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  4. The labor costs, material costs, and equipment costs are FAR greater beyond comparison than the profits. When a vehicle is manufactured in the States, up to 80% of the total cost can stay here whereas only small percentage that is profit margin goes back to the country of the corporate origin. Vica versa when "American" brand is manufactured in Mexico, Canada, China, etc., most of the money stays there, including their taxes. They make "American" in foreign countries because the profit margins are a few percentage points greater while we as country lose billions of dollars in opportunity costs. Your motives are in the right direction, but with that being said, you have another reason to buy what's truly and proudly made in the great USA
     
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  5. In Northern California the most aspirational brand is the Tesla brand which is American made.It maybe small production but the models S is a halo for Tesla car's coming our way by at more mass market prices.In our neighborhood you see much fewer Audi A8's,Mercedes S class and theBMW 7 series all replaced the model S .
     
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  6. If Ford, GM and Chrysler wants USA citizens to buy American Autos ..Let them start by quit making outside of the USA and all this Mexico junk (and other places) they are shipping us, claiming them to be American Autos.
    MAKE IT HERE!
    NAFTA was a BIG Mistake as are most of the other Trade Agreements....It is to benefit the big Corporations profits and at the USA expense. USA is suffering for it. Look at Apple, GE and many others along with the auto corporation. We do not need a trade agreement with Japan, Korea or China. Do it on individual products, not a blanket agreement.
    Put Tariffs on Products that USA deem so.
     
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  7. I guess it depends about what aspect an individual finds important about "American Made". If it is about jobs than it should be primarily about assembly location. You could extend further into supplier and parts locations if you really want that headache. If it is about profits, than I guess you go with the brand, though that gets a bit fuzzy as well as the Chrysler case illustrates most clearly.

    It has worked out that I have one Japanese, one European and one US assembled vehicle. But I buy used, so Americans received all my money regardless.
     
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  8. It's American to support free-market capitalism. And that means buying the best products on the market for your needs and desires, regardless of where they were built or by whom they were built.
     
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  9. Wont be much of a market to be free-market with if all of the USA wealth gets transferred overseas.
     
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  10. To me, where it is made is the deal-breaker. Origin of parts is a big issue as well. How many jobs are being created and maintained? Each person with a job is a potential customer for me.
     
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  11. Whatever puts the most money back in the AMERICAN economy. That's why as much as we liked the Fusion, we didn't buy it because it was made in Mexico. Get with it Ford!!
     
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  12. I should note we bought the Volt instead. Only problem was the battery and tranny were made elsewhere. Now at least the battery is made here. I can't wait to buy another one when the Expedition dies!!
     
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