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2007 Toyota Camry, RAV4 Under Investigation For Door Fires

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If you drive a 2007 Toyota Camry or RAV4, you might want to pay particular attention to the news in coming weeks. According to the Detroit Free Press, those vehicles are being investigated for reports of fires originating in the driver's-side doors.

Neither Toyota nor the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has yet issued a recall for the Camry or RAV4. However, as of last Monday, the NHTSA began investigating six complaints of fires. 

Preliminary reports hint that the problem may be rooted in the power window switch on the driver's-side door. To date, no injuries or fatalities have been associated with the fires, though one Camry was totally destroyed when a fire broke out after the car was started.

Should the problem warrant a full recall of the very popular Camry sedan and RAV4 crossover, it would affect around 830,000 vehicles in total.

If you drive one of the vehicles under investigation and have additional questions, Toyota encourages you to call its customer service line at 800-331-4331. 

However, given the specificity and seriousness of this particular investigation, we'd suggest that you also sign up for recall alerts from the NHTSA. (The NHTSA publishes recall alerts long before automakers begin notifying vehicle owners.) Just visit the Recall Notification registry on the NHTSA website, enter your model year and make -- in this case, 2007 Toyota -- and provide a valid email address. Granted, you may receive recall notices for other 2007 Toyota models, but with a little luck, there won't be many to sift through.

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Comments (6)
  1. I don't know how important this may be in reference to Toyota Camry 2007 ,64000 miles ,recently(for last couple of month) I do experience difficulties in closing window that was previously open on driver side ,it resist closing properly ,window needs more power to close,prolonged engagement of electrical power may cause electrical circuits to burn or short circuit that may cause fire in driver side door ,
     
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  2. Sounds like it could be a related problem, but we won't know for sure until the NHTSA finishes its investigation. For the time being, it might be best to use that window as little as possible and leave it in the "up" position.
     
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  3. This just happend to me this morning. I was on a business trip and leaving the airport. As I was about to pay my parking fee the driver side door started smoking and I saw a small fire starting to flare up on the driver's seat door by the window switch. I turned off the car and within 3 minutes the whole door was up in flames.
     
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  4. Ack! Glad to know you're okay. Be sure to visit the NHTSA website and file a complaint! Start here: https://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov/VehicleComplaint/index.xhtml
     
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  5. this happened to my boss's car when i was driving it, the door started smoking and I immediately stopped the car. The door didn't catch on fire though and we were both safe. What would having a recall do for us? because we use this vehicle for work and it is important for us.
     
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  6. While there's still no official recall, the NHTSA probe has widened: http://www.thecarconnection.com/news/1077072_1-4-million-toyota-models-now-included-in-door-fire-probe

    Definitely let NHTSA know what happened. You can file a complaint here: https://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov/ivoq/

    You should also sign up for recall alerts: http://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov/subscriptions/index.cfm

    And last, you should contact the dealer. Tell them that you're aware this is a widely reported problem, and ask what they can do to help. It seems like a recall may be imminent, and if your dealer is a friendly sort, s/he may repair the damage at little or no charge. However, until NHTSA identifies the problem, dealers won't be able to truly fix it.
     
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