Advertisement
Find a Car
Go!

Higher Fuel Standards For 2025 Coming Today: What They Mean For You

Follow Richard

Old Gas Pumps

Old Gas Pumps

Enlarge Photo

By the year 2025, cars and light trucks sold in the U.S. will have to earn a combined city/highway rating of 54.5 miles per gallon. That's according to new fuel economy regulations set forward by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Transportation, which the Detroit Free Press and other sources expect to be announced today.

If that number sounds a little familiar, it should: back in July, the Obama administration and the EPA announced that they'd struck the very same deal on fuel economy with 13 major automakers, as well as the State of California and the UAW. The announcement today makes that deal official. If the feds follow standard operating procedure, there will be at least a 90-day period of public comment before the regulations take effect (though the Detroit News doesn't expect implementation before the end of July 2012).

The good, the bad

When President Obama announced the proposed regulations last summer, he cited three major reasons to support them:

1. Less dependence on foreign oil: higher fuel economy standards for vehicles mean that people and businesses will use less petroleum, much of which the U.S. imports from other countries. In a letter of support sent to the president earlier this week by over 100 members of Congress, the new regs could "remove the need for as much as 3.8 million barrels of petroleum per day by 2030".

2. More savings for families: President Obama said that the average family will spend $8,000 less on fuel per vehicle under the new guidelines.

3. Less pollution: with the new regulations in place, the U.S. will see fewer CO2 emissions, even before 2025. As the auto industry gears up for the 2025 deadline, the U.S. would emit six million fewer metric tons of CO2 by 2025, which is more than we pump into the atmosphere in a given year.

On the other hand, the new regulations won't come free. Critics point to:

1. Higher vehicle costs: boosting fuel economy is expensive, and automakers are likely to pass most of that cost to consumers. Estimates vary, but by the new standards could add between $1,500 and $6,500 to the cost of a new car. (Note: the higher figure includes expenses for electric vehicles, which are far more costly than combustion-engined rides.)  

2. Higher costs of government: while the cost of fuel-efficiency itself might be mitigated by technological advances and economies of scale, there's no denying that someone's going to have to pay to oversee these new guidelines. Enforcing the rules that the Obama administration has already implemented for 2012 - 2016 are is slated to run $51.5 billion, which will be passed on to consumers at an average of $950 per vehicle by 2016.

What should you expect?

The good news for consumers is that the new regulations will result in savings on fuel. Whether they'll average out to $8,000 per vehicle remains to be seen, but the savings should be significant. 


 
Follow Us

 

Have an opinion?

  • Posting indicates you have read this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use
  • Notify me when there are more comments
Comments (3)
  1. When they speak of light trucks avg +/- 50mpg, are they talking about micro-compacts such as the discontinued (despite the fact it sold enough to compete with the "newer" escape) Ford ranger? Because we don't have any here in the US. And unless smaller diesels become more available for the current compact trucks such as the rest of the world, I say dream on Washington.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  2. Remember, these are fleet-wide averages we're talking about. Light trucks and SUVs won't be held to the same standard as compact cars. Targets for large trucks like the Chevy Silverado will be closer to 33mpg (and real-world stats won't even be quite that high). For details, check the table on page 5 of this PDF from the EPA: http://www.epa.gov/otaq/climate/documents/420f11038.pdf
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

     
  3. thanks,
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

 

Have an opinion? Join the conversation!

Advertisement
Advertisement
Take Us With You!
   
Advertisement

More From High Gear Media


 
 
© 2014 The Car Connection. All Rights Reserved. The Car Connection is published by High Gear Media. Stock photography by Homestar, LLC. Send us feedback.