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Roadtripping With Rover: 9 Tips For A Pet-Friendly Vacation

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'Car Show' by Thomas Hawk on Flickr

'Car Show' by Thomas Hawk on Flickr

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If you live in the northern hemisphere, you probably started thinking about your summer vacation months ago. And if you have pets -- as over 71 million households in the U.S. do -- chances are fairly good that you've considered taking them along for the ride.

Taking a pet on a trip can be fun, but it can also be challenging for the first-timer. With a bit of planning, though, you can turn those challenges into opportunities for great summer memories. Below, you'll find nine useful tips to help prep for your vacation with Fido and Fifi. If you've got others, please share them with us.

One thing to note: dogs can be great travel companions. Nearly all are leash-trainable, so your strolls on the beach or hikes in the woods can be transformed into unforgettable experiences. Other pets...well, other pets are trickier. We've seen some cats that enjoy leashes -- ferrets, too -- but they're not the norm. Before you start packing, think long and hard about whether your pet is suited for travel.

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Tip #1: Plan for pet-friendly lodging
It might seem obvious that if you're traveling with a pet, you'd want to check with hotels, guest-houses, and campgrounds in advance to find one that's pet-friendly. However, we've all had friends who blithely assumed everything would be fine, only to arrive at their destination and discover that their lodgings weren't pet friendly at all -- or that they required a huge, non-refundable deposit. To make sure you're not left in the lurch (especially when booking online), don't just go by a listing, which might not have been updated for years: pick up the phone and call to verify that the place accommodates pets. If you're planning a hotel stay, click here to search for a list of pet-friendly properties.

Tip #2: Give your pet a tune-up
You probably wouldn't set out on a long road trip without having your car checked out, right? The same goes for your pet. Before you roll out of town, stop by the vet for booster shots, rabies tags, and such. That'll ensure that Max is in top-top condition, and if for some reason you have to kennel him (see #9 below), you'll be prepared -- provided you remember to take his paperwork with you. If you haven't already done so, you should probably have your pet chipped while you're there, just in case he or she bolts or gets separated from you on the road.

Tip #3: Book activities in advance
Once you start looking, you'll find that there are pet-friendly activities in almost every vacation destination -- even in big cities. Do your research in advance, though: some attractions are open to pets on certain days of the week, and some have special restrictions. BringFido.com maintains a huge list of activities that you and your pets can enjoy together.

Tip #4: Buckle up (both of you)
If you're traveling by car, be sure to restrain your pet -- ideally in the back seat or cargo area. The safest plan of all is to put him or her in a travel kennel and strap it to a seat. There are less restrictive options, like car seats and harnesses, too. If your pet's a jumper, make sure there's a barrier of some sort to prevent him or her from getting in the front seat with you. We also recommend investing in a blanket or seat cover, which will make cleaning up hair and little accidents much easier and preserve the value of your ride. Sites like DrsFosterSmith.com have a range of options to chose from.


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Comments (2)
  1. We travel with our dog as much as possible. He's a giant breed ( 160 + lbs) so it sometimes is a little more difficult finding a place to stay. We always bring his up to date health records and plenty of fresh water from home. Because our boy is so big he always atracts alot of attention and he loves it.
    We've been traveling with them for years and have never had any problems. Of coarse we make many more frequent stops to let him stretch his legs and do his business. Always pick up after your dog, let him be a good ambassador canine.
     
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  2. Don't forget to roll down the windows and let the animal stick it's head out - something you would ever let your kids do... at least I hope not - can't tell from some of these people I see with arms hanging down side of door and doors sticking out of windows!
     
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