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Report: 2014 Ford Mustang Will Do More, With Less


2011 Ford Mustang

2011 Ford Mustang

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To the Mustang faithful, change is rarely a good thing. Change, however, may be coming to the 2014 Mustang, which will mark the 50th anniversary of the venerable pony car.

A report from The Mustang News suggests the 2013 Mustang will likely be the last model year for the current car. The site says a slight downsizing is in the works with the new pony car in the planning stages. Insiders expect shrinkage to be kept to a minimum; a Focus-sized Mustang would be a sales disaster for Ford, and no one wants a repeat of the Mustang II, served up during the years of the original gas crisis.

Weight savings, on the other hand is likely to come from the use of aluminum panels (like Mazda's current MX-5, which uses an aluminum hood and trunk lid) and high-strength steel in key areas. The current Mustang is a superb car, but it's not exactly a lightweight track terror. It's the lightest of the pony cars, but the new GT still tips the scales at 3,605 pounds; that doesn't help its handling, and it certainly doesn't help its fuel economy, a critical concern as manufacturers are hit with upcoming CAFE requirements.

There's also word that the next Mustang will get a fully independent rear suspension, but this could be related more to platform globalization than to owner complaints, if it's true. Drive the current Mustang and you soon realize that the live axle is a non-issue on all but the roughest pavement. Still, Ford can't justify the expense of a unique platform for the Mustang any longer, so expect to see a version of the Australian Ford Falcon used as the basis of the next Mustang--which begs the question of whether the Falcon will get an independent suspension all around as well.

Powertrains aren't likely to change much from the current offerings, although Bill Ford did let slip recently that an EcoBoost Mustang was under development. Ford's EcoBoost V-6 puts out less horsepower than their 5.0 liter V-8 engine, weighs more and returns similar fuel economy, but could be pitched as a modern-day SVO. If an alternative EcoBoost Mustang is in the works, we suspect it will be a four-cylinder EcoBoost variant to cover the entry-level market.

Styling remains the big question mark, and Ford design chief J Mays is silent on the topic. We had an opportunity to discuss the next Mustang with Mays at last year's Ford Explorer launch, and it was clear that he was measuring each word carefully. Without giving specifics, he said that Ford was "well aware" of the significance of the Mustang's golden anniversary, and promised that the Mustang faithful wouldn't be disappointed.

Mays' word is good enough for us, and we can't wait to see what Ford has in store.

[The Mustang News]

 
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Comments (21)
  1. The current Mustang is a huge, heavy car. But once you get inside of it, it's small. You sit very low in the thing and shoulder-to-shoulder, like an old 70s Pinto. It's difficult to see out of which makes maneuvering all of that power a dangerous proposition, just like a 60s vehicle. Simply put, it's a very dated platform. Yeah, it's fast and sometimes fun to drive but the fuel it SUCKS down is sickening. It is really really really long overdue for a modern, contemporary rendition. Don't ruin it. Fix it.
     
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  2. Fuel usage is far better than any previous mustang.The current mustang has a very superior chassis.....best mustang so far. quit whining!
     
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  3. Amen, Rich - I agree. It's a blast to drive, as long as you don't have to feed it. It's the most nimble of the current pony cars on a racetrack, but that's not exactly praise. I'd still buy a new GT if I had the disposable income, but I can't help thinking the 2014 model may be worth waiting for.
     
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  4. you don't buy a muscle car and expect 35mpg. i averaged 21-23mpg in my 2000 mustang GT, and i really think that's awesome considering most V6 sedans only average 25-27. yes high fuel prices are a factor. so buy a V6 mustang that gets 31 on the highway. otherwise, buy a 4cylinder Honda accord coupe.
     
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  5. Travis, the new Mustang GT does great on the highway, and I saw around 25 MPG loafing along in sixth gear. It gets thirsty around town, depending upon how enthusiastically you drive it. In a best case scenario, the Mustang GT is your fun weekend car, and the 4 cylinder Honda is what you commute in M-F.
     
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  6. The Falcon already has an independent rear suspension. It's had one for years. The problem is that Falcon sales are extremely poor... you even see Mays saying they aren't sustainable and that very likely the next Falcon would be based on the North American Taurus. The Aussies say, of course, "drop dead" to that idea. http://www.drivingenthusiast.net/sec-blog/?p=9656
     
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  7. Downsizing and lightening can be a good thing. Just so long as it doesn't end up being another Probe.
     
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  8. Good you brought up the Mustang II P.O.S. Let us hope Ford doesn't repeat that mistake. Surprised the name/model survived that debacle.
     
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  9. yeah too bad the mustang II set sales records......and was NOT just a pinto based rip-off....NOTHING wromg with the II.
    even took car of the year.
     
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  10. @kencobrajet, Ford sold a ton of them, but the four-bangers seemed terrifyingly slow.
     
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  11. Rich, I can only wonder if you have driven the new GT? Dated platform? Manuevering dangerous? Please. I drive a 2011 GT (my 6th Mustang since 2006) and absolutely love it. I get so many thumbs up, stares, and comments from people who LOVE the way this car looks. The best part is the sound the screaming V8 makes...mmmmm. Gas mileage is a combined 19 for me, but like someone said, the Mustang isn't about gas mileage. Let the people drive boring Prius' I say, more gas for me :)
     
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  12. Rich, I can only wonder if you have driven the new GT? Dated platform? Manuevering dangerous? Please. I drive a 2011 GT (my 6th Mustang since 2006) and absolutely love it. I get so many thumbs up, stares, and comments from people who LOVE the way this car looks. The best part is the sound the screaming V8 makes...mmmmm. Gas mileage is a combined 19 for me, but like someone said, the Mustang isn't about gas mileage. Let the people drive boring Prius' I say, more gas for me :)
     
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  13. You people are jumping the gun on this one. The Mustang will not change drastically. Ford can't afford to re-engineer the car, meaning any changes made will be minor. Maybe a 1.5 inch shorter track, with the car shrinking 3 inches total. Aluminum doors + aluminum hood= @125lb weight loss. None of those "improvements" will turn the current model into a dynamically different vehicle.
     
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  14. Ralph, Ford is going to a global platform across all vehicles, so having a separate platform for the Mustang (like they do now) just doesn't make financial sense. Also, all of the automakers are scrambling to find ways to boost fuel economy with the revised CAFE standards looming. Since Ford knows they can't stuff a four cylinder into the Mustang (or worse, build a Mustang hybrid), their only choice will be to put the next car on a serious diet. I guess we'll know for sure in about 18 months.
     
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  15. Converting to a global platform would only increase weight. Look at the Camaro. Furthermore, the global platform (current Euro-Ford) is strictly FWD. Since noone wants a FWD Mustang, the only reasonable option is to work with the existing platform. I wish Ford would engineer a new RWD platform but that would mean the Fusion, Taurus, Flex and Edge would all have to switch as well.
     
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  16. I own an 2003 XR6 Ford Falcon and it has independant rear suspension.
     
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  17. I own a '96 Mustang GT. The curb weight is only 3100 lbs. If I researched the numbers correctly it is only about 1.5 seconds slower than a current Mustang GT in the 0-60 run. Perhaps the new Mustang will be about the same size with the newer engines.
     
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  18. no way does a 4.6 come close to what the new Coyote powered Mustang runs.up to 60.
     
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  19. Wow Rich, you must be keeping your foot down to the floor if your Mustang is getting bad MPG. I own a 2010 Shelby GT500 and consistantly get 19 MPG, this with a car that has 540HP!! And man, this thing will fly!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
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  20. Thinking Rich drove a CAMARO...you do NOT sit down low in a mustang like you do in a Camaro......with it's bunker like window sills.........
     
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  21. October 2004 drove a 2005 out the showroom 281,000 miles later will be driving a 2014 Mustang out of the showroom as long as they use RED paint!!!!
     
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