Advertisement
Find a Car
Go!

2011 Greenest Vehicles List: A Baker’s Dozen of Diverse Cars Page 2


 

2011 Chevrolet Cruze Eco

2011 Chevrolet Cruze Eco

Enlarge Photo

Chevrolet Cruze Eco

The greenest of the all-new 2011 Chevrolet Cruze lineup is Cruze Eco with its 28 mpg city/42 mpg highway estimated fuel economy. The Cruze Eco achieves its fuel efficiency increases over other Cruze compact models (which get 24/36 city/highway mpg) with its 1.4-liter turbocharged in-line four-cylinder engine paired with a six-speed manual transmission, due the addition of a few components to reduce aerodynamic drag and low-rolling resistance tires. For more information on the 2011 Chevrolet Cruze, see this review in The Car Connection.

2011 Hyundai Elantra

2011 Hyundai Elantra

Enlarge Photo

Hyundai Elantra

Updated for 2011 with exterior design that echoes the larger Sonata, part of Hyundai’s “fluidic sculpture design,” the 2011 Elantra compact is fun to drive, affordable, economical – and gets 29 mpg city/40 mpg highway. Want more details on the 2011 Hyundai Elantra? Check out Bengt Halvorson’s article here.

2011 MINI Cooper SD

2011 MINI Cooper SD

Enlarge Photo

MINI Cooper

MINI Cooper may not be for everyone, but the tiny car looks good, handles well, and gets 29 mpg city/37 mpg highway with 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine and six-speed automatic tranny in the base model. What about the MINI E electric vehicle? Right now, it’s only a year-long test with 450 consumers already selected, living in the New York City metropolitan area and California’s metropolitan Los Angeles-Orange County area. For more info on the 2011 MINI Cooper, see this review in The Car Connection.

2010 Toyota Yaris 5dr LB Auto (Natl) Angular Front Exterior View

2010 Toyota Yaris 5dr LB Auto (Natl) Angular Front Exterior View

Enlarge Photo

Toyota Yaris

With its 1.5-liter four-cylinder gasoline engine and manual gearbox, the 2011 Toyota Yaris (2010 pictured here) achieves an EPA-estimated 29 mpg city/36 mpg highway fuel economy. Roomy front seats, affordable price and good safety features make the Yaris great for city driving, but it’s not the best performer around and the interior is pretty Spartan.

2011 Mazda2 exterior and detail

2011 Mazda2 exterior and detail

Enlarge Photo

Mazda2

The ‘zoom-zoom’ 2011 Mazda2 is a cute, great handling, economical compact hatchback that lives up to its image as a fun urban runabout. With 29 mpg city/35 mpg highway, it’s also fuel-stingy with 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine and manual transmission. Though it seats five, the Mazda2 is probably best for a young (or young-at-heart) couple, singles, and those with small kids only.

2011 Chevrolet Volt Z-Spec

2011 Chevrolet Volt Z-Spec

Enlarge Photo

Chevrolet Volt

The all-new 2011 Chevrolet Volt extended-range EV comes in at number 13 on the Greenest Vehicles list – and was just edged out by the Mazda2 “by a hair,” according to the ACEEE. The Volt combines an electric drive unit with a 1.4-liter four-cylinder gasoline-powered engine that acts as a generator. The Volt will run 35 miles on all-electric power before the gasoline generator kicks in.

Want to stay in-the-know on Family Car Guide news? Sign up for our free newsletter or follow us on Facebook or Twitter.

 

[ACEEE, greenercars.org]


Advertisement
 
Follow Us

 

Have an opinion?

  • Posting indicates you have read this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use
  • Notify me when there are more comments
Comments (3)
  1. I'd like to see a list of most fuel efficient family sized cars for those of us who need more room for around town or family road trips. I've noticed a trend in the above list of cars in that the hybrids are now getting better highway mileage than city - has something changed in the way they work vs the older frequent braking charging the batteries method?
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  2. @Road Mice - Thanks for your comment about family cars for in-town and road trips. Good suggestion. Regarding your question, yes, some automakers have changed the way they are controlling their hybrid systems. Check out Green Car Reports (one of the High Gear Media websites) for more information on green cars. And, check out Family Car Guide for more articles on various kinds of family vehicles.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  3. @Road Mice - Here's a more detail explanation from John Voelcker, editor of Green Car Reports. "Traditionally, hybrids have worked best in stop-and-go urban traffic, where the engine can switch off frequently and the battery and electric motor can move the vehicle using only electricity for short distances (up to a mile) at low speeds (30 mph or less). This is best suited to dense, crowded, high-traffic metropolises like Tokyo, London, and New York.
    In the U.S., however, that kind of duty cycle is less common for many buyers than is a higher-speed, longer-range suburban cycle that includes speeds up to 50 or 60 mph punctuated with less frequent stops.
    So more recent hybrids, especially those expected to sell primarily in the States, may be tuned to provide their benefits at highway speeds as well. One is the Hyundai Sonata Hybrid, now arriving at dealerships. Hyundai data shows that U.S. drivers spend roughly 55 percent of their driving time at freeway speeds, so the Sonata Hybrid provides electric assist at speeds up to 70 mph--and its highway mileage rating is higher than its city rating, the reverse of the ratings for most hybrids."
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

 

Have an opinion? Join the conversation!

Advertisement
Try My Showroom
Save cars, write notes, and comparison shop with hi-res photos.
Add your first car
Advertisement
Take Us With You!
   
Related Used Listings
Browse used listings in your area
Advertisement

 
© 2014 The Car Connection. All Rights Reserved. The Car Connection is published by High Gear Media. Stock photography by izmo, Inc. Send us feedback.