Safety Watch: Nine 2011 Vehicles That Still Lack Stability Control Page 3

November 12, 2010
2010 Honda Civic Sedan

2010 Honda Civic Sedan

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2011 Honda Civic

We've criticized Honda for only bundling some most-wanted—and some would say necessary, given state laws—Bluetooth connectivity features on top trims of its vehicles. Well, for the Civic, that applies to electronic stability control, too. To get ESC on a Civic Coupe or Sedan, you need to step all the way up to a 2011 Honda Civic EX-L, costing around $22k. Although Honda hasn't yet released pricing and details on the 2011 Honda Fit, for the 2010 Fit you also had to get the top-of-the-line Fit Sport, specially optioned with Honda's VSA.

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2010 Hyundai Accent

2010 Hyundai Accent

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2011 Hyundai Accent

While Hyundai has earned heaps of good words from us for most of its current product line, the 2011 Accent is perhaps the strongest exception. In the current market, it's just a small, cheap car—the lowest-priced on the market, at $9,985 before destination, but one that skimps on safety. Anti-lock brakes, the foundation for electronic stability control, are only offered on top Accent SE hatchback trims (or part of a $1,050 option package on the Accent sedan. Look for an all-new Accent next year—likely with standard stability control.

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