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Rabbits Cause No Start Symptom At Airport


A diet that is rich in soy has many benefits – lowering bad cholesterol, preserving levels of the good kind, not to mention being rich in nutrients like protein, amino acids, fiber and calcium. So what has this got to do with cars? We’ll have to take a trip to the parking lots of Denver International Airport to find out.

According KWGN, the local CW affiliate, there is some healthy eating going on at the Pike’s Peak lot at DIA. A vacationer returned after a nine day holiday only to find that his brand new VW Jetta would hardly crank. When he got it started he sought the help of the dealer, as anyone would, knowing that it is covered under the bumper to bumper warranty.

The service representative quizzed the owner if he had just picked up the Jetta from DIA and the gentleman responded, “Well as a matter of fact I did.” The culprit, according to the dealer, are rabbits who have combined exercise and a healthy diet to ensure against early onset cardio vascular disease.

The bunnies are feasting on rubber coated wires and other delicacies that may be infused with soy oil during the manufacturing process. Ford seems to be leading the way in the use of soy oil but some may have made its way into this VW product, then again, as we all know healthy diets get boring after awhile. So there’s no confirmation that the wires in question were laced with soy.

Since it is always good to take advantage of a teachable moment, here’s the latest tidbit (sorry couldn’t resist) from Ford about soy oil based rubber:

1.)    It serves as a 25 percent replacement for petroleum based oil in the production process

2.)    It more than doubles rubber’s stretchability over petro based rubber

3.)    It has been used for some time in foam applications such as seat cushions, seatbacks and headliners

4.)    More than 2 million existing Ford vehicles have this technology on board

5.)    Ford is applying for a patent so that soy based rubber can be used in additional parts such as  deflector shields and baffles, radiator deflector shields, cupholder inserts and floor mats.

So how did the incident at DIA turn out? The Jetta owner didn’t get any satisfaction from the airport just a $55 parking fee and a $238 bill for the repair from the dealer. Evidently, bumper to bumper warranties don’t cover damage caused by voracious rabbit appetites. As for the rabbits, you have to wonder about its impact on their auto immune system.

[KWGN & Ford]

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  1. The chipmunks ate the wiring in my Ford150 King Ranch,cost $300 @ the dealership to fix.
     
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