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Toyota Recalls: The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly

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2009 Toyota Tundra

2009 Toyota Tundra

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Over many months, we've seen Toyota's recall issues go from bad to worse, to Capitol Hill, and then seen the flocks of lawyers descend like vultures.

Meanwhile, it's sounding Toyota really has become a better, stronger company—having fixed a major portion of the affected vehicles, gone to great lengths to show that its cars don't have an issue with electronic throttles, and changed the way that it develops vehicles and monitors quality.

To help you get through all the reports out there, we've put together this useful list for a quick look at what Toyota has done, and what it still has to deal with to move beyond the recalls:

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The good: Toyota says that it hasn't yet found one instance of an electrical fault in about 4,200 vehicles it's reviewed—all vehicles for which their drivers had claimed instances of sudden acceleration.

The bad: Insurers have doled out millions for sudden-acceleration-related claims, and they're not going to have Toyota leave them empty-handed.

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The good: Toyota reported that "customer concerns regarding acceleration" reported to the company have dropped by 80 percent compared to April 2010.

The bad: That still means that the company is registering 150 of such complaints per week.

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The good: Toyota's hard-working dealerships have completed nearly five million repairs related to one or both of the automaker's major acceleration-related recalls.

The bad: Only about 65 percent of recall repairs are done. More than 11 million recall notices were issued, and more than eight million vehicles were affected.

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The ugly: Allstate is waging a $3 million suit against Toyota; several other insurers remain in negotiation with Toyota, looking for settlements; and there could be many more court cases to come.

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[Toyota; NY Times; Bloomberg]

 
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