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Rally-Car Rivalry: 2011 Subaru WRX vs 2010 Mitsubishi Ralliart

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With an editorial staff, split across the country and even in Australia, we're often hard-pressed to do the sorts of comparison tests that are very helpful in sorting out rival models.

But sometimes the stars align just right, as they recently did when I returned on a flight, fresh from driving the new 2011 Subaru Impreza WRX, and hopped right into a 2010 Mitsubishi Lancer Ralliart Sportback. To help you compare and cross-shop the two, here are some notes on these two archrivals:

First impressions can be deceiving

In both our First Drive of the 2010 Ralliart Sportback last year, we'd noted that road noise could be an issue. So I'd expected it to be louder inside and it proved otherwise. Yes, the Ralliart was a bit louder than the WRX, but not by much.

The excellent Recaros in the 2010 Ralliart Sportback were firm and supportive, wrapping around the back, however for this tall driver the integral headrest was too low and couldn't be adjusted.

On first glance, there's an obvious power-to-weight deficit in the Ralliart, compared to the WRX, but truth is, surprisingly, the two feel quite evenly matched. The Ralliart weighs about 200 pounds more yet makes about 20 hp less—and lacks low-rev torque in much the same way—so from a standing start the Ralliart feels not sluggish and not much different than an on-a-budget small car.

Once the revs rise and you get past 10 or 15 mph in first gear, that slightly sluggish feeling is forgotten as you follow the twin-clutch gearbox's expert shifts and the turbo's forgiving boost on up past 80, 90 mph and beyond. One of the keys to why the Ralliart feels so perky is that it makes 9 more foot-pounds of peak torque at 3,000 rpm—1,000 lower than the Subaru. So much for displacement.

Ralliart holds the transmission trump card

Thanks to the Twin-Clutch Sportronic transmission, shifts are quick and direct, with only a slight lurch shifting into second or third when you're taking off gingerly. What's more, when you're driving the Ralliart harder, you'll appreciate the sturdy column (not steering-wheel) mounted shift paddles.

With the 2011 Subaru WRX, a five-speed manual transmission is still the way of shifting, and the throws are a bit long and awkward. Subaru officials have told us that there are no plans for an automatic transmission in the WRX anytime soon. There aren't any options that would fit with the automaker's unique boxer engine layout, and the company, having just invested in its own CVT design, doesn't have the resources to design a new automatic that could take the WRX or STI's power and torque.


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Comments (2)
  1. This is the lamest review/comparison i have ever read. There is no comparison. I can't even tell that the author even looked at the cars. Just a hint when you "compare" something you have to actually compare it not just meander around one of the products for most of the review then a paragraph on the end to briefly mention the other product.
     
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  2. No kidding, Stewart.. I kept looking for the rest of it... I paid nothing to view this article and yet I still feel like I want my money back! Worst "review" I've ever read. :P
     
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