Advertisement
Find a Car
Go!

2011 Ford Explorer: 'Jaw-Dropping' MPG, Adventurer Appeal

Follow Bengt

2008 Ford Explorer America Concept

2008 Ford Explorer America Concept

Enlarge Photo

With the introduction of the 2011 Ford Explorer, Ford will have three different crossover utility vehicles—Explorer, Edge, and Flex—all selling beside each other at showrooms, all approximately the same size, and with two of the three (the Explorer and Flex) on the same platform as the Taurus sedan.

Is there room for a third model without cannibalizing sales for the others? That's what TheCarConnection.com asked Ford sales analyst George Pipas, who had just finished a discussion on market growth for small cars—including that Ford Motor Co. (NYSE: F) expects U.S. sales of small vehicles (cars and crossovers combined) to grow to 36 percent of the market by 2013.

"If we're right about the 36 percent, that still means that 64 percent is medium and large, at least in the next five years," said Pipas. "Yes, we expect small cars to grow more. But there will still be plenty of mediums and larges rolling around," and it will take multiple models to meet a wide range of shopper needs, he explained.

One of those medium utility vehicles will be the 2011 Explorer. "We believe there's a market, for people who are living a lifestyle of adventure," said Pipas. "But we've got to make this thing fuel-efficient because if it's only 19 [mpg], then that's not the direction we're headed. It has to be something jaw-dropping."

Ford has said very little yet about the 2011 Ford Explorer officially, though with this week's announcement that it will be built in Chicago, it said that the new utility vehicle will have "unibody construction, Ford’s EcoBoost engine technology, a six-speed transmission and lightweight materials."


 
Follow Us

 

Have an opinion?

  • Posting indicates you have read this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use
  • Notify me when there are more comments
Comments (11)
  1. But nary a word on diesels, the easiest way to get to 25 MPG. "The U.K. version of the Tiguan TDi is pulling off a combined 32.6 mpg".
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  2. Yeah, I agree. Diesels are the way to go. I am surprised that nobody has really done it. Jeep tried with the Liberty, and it failed. The average consumer can't get past the stigma of the old dirty diesel of yesterday. Todays' diesels are a far cry from that.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  3. For many of us, it's the availability of diesel fuel in the U.S. I live in the Midwest (U.S.) and it can be tough to find a local diesel station. When I do find it in the city, it's often a $1 more per gallon than gasoline. Although in the long run I can save on gas with a diesel, there is the psychological impact at the pump every time you pay a buck more per gallon.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  4. I agree with you, Kurt. I drove a friends a new Mercedes diesel and it's impossible to tell the difference between it and a gasoline model (except the torque). However, she made it clear that it's more difficult to find stations with diesel fuel, and the price is higher. I think it's to late, too little for diesel cars in the USA.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  5. There is no market in the US for Diesel. Car companies would be stupid to try to tell people what to buy, consumers tell the car companies what they want and Americans want high performance and high milage gasoline engines. The companies that try to "re-invent the wheel" with fringe types of fuel are going to be the losers, all in the name of saving the planet. just make the gas engine more effecient and call it a day
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  6. RE: Diesel. Nothing ventured, nothing gained. I think with the proper ad campaign (showing the benefits in added mpg and that today's diesel is not your grandpa's diesel) it would be worth a small test market analysis.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  7. 25% better than 16 MPG = 20 MPG, which is still pathetic. Why is that jaw-dropping - because it is still so low?
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  8. I'd like to replace my 2000 Explorer one of these years. Based on what I've read so far, it doesn't look like the 2011 Explorer is the vehicle that will do it. Think I'll mosey on over to the Nissan lot and see what they've got.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  9. a car manufacturer needs to make a medium sized wagon/suv with AWD and a diesel engine that exceeds 30 mpg highway. Runaway winner.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  10. I can not belive how many people do not understand how marketing works or even basic physics, This is still a 4000 lbs SUV that can tow 5000
    lbs. The explorer 2011 Explorer is the best option in the market for the money.Case close!
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  11. Blah, blah, blah. The Koreans did it first. Just buy the Kia Sorento 3.5 v6. It will cost you less and give you 20/27 mpg. Also 10/100,000 miles warranty isn't bad either. Lastly, you would help real working Americans in the Kia Motors Georgia Plant keep working. Go KIA!!!!
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

 

Have an opinion? Join the conversation!

Advertisement
Advertisement
Take Us With You!
   
Advertisement

More From High Gear Media


 
 
© 2014 The Car Connection. All Rights Reserved. The Car Connection is published by High Gear Media. Stock photography by Homestar, LLC. Send us feedback.