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Hyundai To Launch i10 Electric Vehicle In 2010

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Hyundai i10 electric vehicle

Hyundai i10 electric vehicle

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As our own Viknesh Vijayenthiran mentioned on Friday, Hyundai has announced that it will launch a mass-market electric vehicle in the second half of 2010. The vehicle will be a modified version of the existing Hyundai i10 minicar and will appear first in the company's home country of South Korea. A prototype is expected to debut at the Frankfurt Motor Show next week.

The Hyundai i10 EV will be powered by a 16 kWh lithium-ion battery (courtesy of LG) feeding a 49 kWh/65 hp electric motor. The hatchback's range should clock in at a respectable 100 miles, and its top speed will be around 80 mph.

Perhaps the most interesting fact about the Hyundai i10 EV is its ability to handle two charging cycles: the standard 220 V found in many households around the globe, and a significantly stronger, more industrial 415 V current. Not surprisingly, the 415 V offers a much faster re-charge: on the 220 V plug,  a full charge of the battery will take about five hours, but on the 415 V, the battery can hit 85% of capacity in 15 minutes. That's pretty exciting -- though until the 415 V infrastructure improves, it does nothing to alleviate consumers' range anxiety.

[Carscoop]

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Comments (16)
  1. Good for Hyundai, so now how do we get 415v in the garage?
     
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  2. this one is really interesting. understand using the 415 V current is not realistic for consumers at this point, happy to see OE's are starting to put in options that may push a discussion around changing/upgrades/next gen for existing infrastructure.
     
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  3. Seems like everyone's doing it; Honda is the latest subject of rumors that they'll launch a small EV.
    I suspect no one expected the Mitsubishi i-MiEV to be quite as well received as it has been:
    http://www.greencarreports.com/blog/1021549_drive-report-2010-mitsubishi-i-miev-electric-car
    and
    http://www.greencarreports.com/blog/1020297_mitsubishis-smash-success-spawns-5-more-electric-vehicles
     
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  4. How does this compare to the other electric cars that are in the US?
     
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  5. Interesting that suddenly so many automakers are offering electric vehicles. The best part is the fact it can handle a 220 V which is so accessible. It is a funny looking car, but who cares?
     
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  6. Looks like Nissan's LEAF has a competitor on its hands, though the LEAF does turn out about twice as much power. Maybe the Hyundai will be a lot cheaper.
     
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  7. we are getting closer and closer to the tipping point -- when every car makes electric cars and its less of a separate line on a production schedule and more just "how we make some cars."
     
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  8. I'm still not convinced about range anxiety being such a significant issue already. Though I suppose it could be by the time many of these EVs arrive if the media keeps suggesting it. 100 miles should be plenty for most commuters, and if you have a two-hour roundtrip commute on the Interstate you probably wouldn't do it in a non-range-extended minicar anyway.
     
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  9. wont it all come down to cost? the more car manufacturers will produce these cars , the sooner price will come down. Once this happens no question cost will come down..
     
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  10. Hyundai i10 EV is its ability to handle two charging... - sounds good.
     
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  11. @Bob: It's a little too early to say how the i10 compares, since (a) there aren't a lot of details about the i10 EV yet, and (b) there aren't a lot of EVs on the road to which it can be held up. However, when the dust settles, the i10 will probably be roughly comparable to the Nissan Leaf and the Toyota EV (the one that's set to be modeled on the Toyota/Scion iQ). A couple of years ago, those might've overshadowed the i10, but given Hyundai's rising star, I think the playing field has become much more level -- at least as far as public perception is concerned.
    _
    @Bengt: On one level, I completely agree that a 100-mile range is completely sufficient for most drivers. However, I can think of a few caveats:
    _
    (1) Until infrastructure improves, city drivers without garages (e.g. me) are going to be wary of vehicles that ought to be charged every night or every other night. The idea of running a power cord down the sidewalk and around the block isn't so appealing to me.
    _
    (2) For now, I think cars like this are meant as second cars. I have a hard time imagining a family choosing this as their primary vehicle -- especially lower-to-middle income families. Which means that the very consumers who might be drawn to the i10's (presumably) low-ish price may be turned off by its limitations. That's a pretty big segment to cut off.
    _
    (3) Even those who CAN afford a second vehicle might think twice about spending thousands on something that takes five hours to amp up after 100 miles on the road. Of course, I'm probably biased: living in New Orleans, if a vehicle isn't capable of handling eight good hours of hurricane evacuation traffic, I'm not interested ;-)
     
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  12. Although automakers are manufacturing electric cars... it will take a long time for people to embrace these cars.
     
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  13. Great news that there will be more choices in the EV space. Hyundai's new vehicle sounds promising. It will be interesting to see how the prototype is received at the Frankfurt Motor Show next week.
     
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  14. With any new technology there will always be a slow introduction period. Good to see automakers finally stepping it up a gear.
     
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  15. @Richard: I'm with you on points 1 and 2. A lot of urban-dwelling EV early adopters won't have big garages and access to charging ports at home. Let's hope they do at work, right? Regarding demand, we won't know if people will really put their money down until EVs are for sale. From the car-as-appliance side of it, they're naturals for car-sharing and fleets first.
     
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  16. I hope all this is not "too little, too late" for mother earth.
    Anyway it should somewhat lower the dependency in oil I guess
     
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