Ford's EcoBoost Almost Ready For Liftoff Page 2

May 15, 2009

Ford also pointed out that the 3.5-liter EcoBoost runs just fine on regular 87-octane fuel.

Every EcoBoost V-6 engine is connected to a six-speed automatic transmission and an all-wheel-drive system. This combination completely eleminates all torque steer (found on some high-powered front-wheel-drive vehicles).

The heavy-duty six-speed automatic handles the EcoBoost's power elegantly. Even shifts at full-throttle can hardly be felt. I queried an engineer about this, and he noted that the flow of power feels seamless because it is. The engine's flat torque curve enables the transmission to shift gears at a near constant level of torque delivery, something the Ford people call "torque matching." In the past, engineers have reduced engine power during shifts to increase smoothness, but that's not what's happening with the EcoBoost. Engineers leave the engine on full boil and do a better job of matching engine speed to transmission speed.

Another important point about the EcoBoost V-6 is that it is nearly idential in size to non-turbo version. Technically, it's actually a couple milimeters smaller in some dimensions. This means that whereever Ford offers the non-turbo 3.5-liter, the EcoBoost engine will fit. Anybody think an EcoBoost Fusion Sport might be fun? Sure it would be, but not as fun as a Mustang with an EcoBoost V-6. This new engine is much smaller than the 4.6-liter V-8 in the 2010 Mustang GT, plus it makes 35 more horsepower than this engine. Seems like a logical next step to us, and Ford has promised to roll out EcoBoost technology into 90-percent of its vehicles by 2013.

Stay tuned.

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