Advertisement
Find a Car
Go!

Mich., Ca. Differ On Emissions Regs: What Should Obama Do?


creative commons - flickr.com: http://www.flickr.com/photos/misteroy/3012971378/

creative commons - flickr.com: http://www.flickr.com/photos/misteroy/3012971378/

Enlarge Photo

Tree-huggers on the left coast, championed by Conan-No-Longer-The-Barbarian Schwarzenegger, want to impose strict new standards that would dictate a 30 percent reduction in vehicle emissions by 2013. At least 13 other states feel similarly, and they've banded together to ask the Obama Administration to allow them to navigate around current EPA guidelines preventing them from taking action. On Wednesday, Schwarzenneger and CARB (California Air Resources Board) even wrote Obama an official request.

Michigan Attorney General Mike Cox is incensed, arguing that allowing states to set their own emissions standards would "be devastating to the auto industry." He claims that, as written, the Clean Air Act and the Energy Policy and Conservation Act prevent California and other states from taking independent action where emissions regulation is concerned.

So, WSOD (What Should Obama Do)?

Barack Obama

Barack Obama

Enlarge Photo

We already reported that the Obama Administration and then-EPA-nominee Lisa Jackson seemed to be leaning towards granting some type of waiver for California and other states. And during his campaign, Obama put in writing that he'd allow California to impose its own regulations. Just last night the 46-year-old Jackson, a Princeton-educated chemical engineer, was officially confirmed to head the U.S. EPA (making her the first African-American to do so).

Claimed benefits of allowing states to set their own emissions standards include a reduction of airborne health risks in congested areas and a reduction in global warming. But there are plenty who fiercely contest Al Gore's raison d'etre, and others say that California's recently-passed diesel emissions regs are beating up an already bloodied trucking industry.

Suddenly my job seems really, really easy.

[source: Detroit News]

Advertisement
 
Follow Us

 

Have an opinion?

  • Posting indicates you have read this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use
  • Notify me when there are more comments
Comments (2)
  1. "Think outside the box"

    The US Government needs to re-frame the discussion. The question shouldn't be "should we make vehicle manufacturers reduce emissions?" it should be "how can the government help vehicle manufacturers reduce emissions?" This could be achieved through improving the infrastructure. For example, in Japan they have buses with steel wheels that drop down allowing them to run on rails. If we imported that idea to the US and put truck lanes into the interstates with rails we could also devise a way to deliver electrical power to the trucks while they're on the rails. Those who counter that electricity has to come from somewhere and that somewhere is dirty coal well, you're wrong in this case. This would be new demand and thus the power stations to run it would need to be built, thus we could build green generators. This is but one possible solution if the government changes it's mindset.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  2. "right track"

    Tom - smart thinking, thanks for shedding light on how other countries are making transportation smarter and cleaner without harming industry in the process. I've heard talk of the new administration creating huge amounts of jobs rebuilding various infrastructures and creating new, clean ones - I hope such plans come to fruition.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

 

Have an opinion? Join the conversation!

Advertisement
Advertisement
Try My Showroom
Save cars, write notes, and comparison shop with hi-res photos.
Add your first car
Take Us With You!
   
Advertisement

 
© 2014 The Car Connection. All Rights Reserved. The Car Connection is published by High Gear Media. Stock photography by izmo, Inc. Send us feedback.
Advertisement