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Intel Inside (Your Electric Car)?


creative commons - flickr.com: http://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk/2747778256/

creative commons - flickr.com: http://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk/2747778256/

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Intel's former chairman Andrew Grove is exerting considerable pressure on the company to explore the world of car battery production. Grove feels that the promising industry will bloom into a huge profit center, and as such is pushing Intel hard in this direction.

Currently, the most promising (and capable) suppliers for electric, E-REV, and hybrid vehicle batteries are located in Japan. There are a few American upstarts, such as firm A123 Systems who is helping GM with development of the 2011 Chevrolet Volt, but they represent a very small portion of the total of electric battery production capacity.

The current economic crisis poses a considerable challenge to Intel if it wants to join the electric battery fray; the firm's sales have dropped 12 percent from the third to the fourth quarter of 2008. But if electric, E-REV, and gas/electric hybrid vehicle sales take off in the U.S., Grove's gamble might prove extremely profitable.--Colin Mathews

[source: Kicking Tires via The Wall Street Journal]
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Comment (1)
  1. As long as electric vehicles are only the "next big thing" I will remain sceptical of them. People get bored and loose interest quickly and move on to whatever next grabs their attention. Also are we creating another bubble economy as people rush into electric cars pushing up prices and values of these companies, only to come crashing down once reality sets in.
    I am not sure the technology is sufficiently mature and there are a lot of promising being made as to speed, how far they can travel, longevity and safety that just have not been tested on an industrial scale. What might work for a couple of expensive engineering peices doesn't neccessarily translate into the real world. What all this means is that if the vehicles don't live up to promises and don't deliver what people want (eg GM's first electric car) it will fail and billions will be wasted.
    Further, I have said it before and will say it again, I have my doubts about Tesla, and whether or not it is a scam. Though I do hope that Fisker can be successful, love the Karma, huge and ostentatious as only an American car can be but with the curves of an Italian sports car.
    The internal combustion engine still has a lot of tricks up its sleeve and is proven performer, the birth of the electric revolution has yet to be proven.
     
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