Advertisement
Find a Car
Go!

SEMA 2008: The Most Expensive Rims Ever


2008 SEMA

2008 SEMA

Enlarge Photo
The tunerfest that is SEMA is known for audacious cars on the hairy edge of taste--well, OK, far beyond it. Wheels are a particular fetish for this crowd, and each year, it's a competition to see who can field the biggest, baddest, most expensive rims in the hall.

This year, TheCarConnection.com headed to the South Hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center on a mission: to find the most egregious and the coolest examples of the wheel genre. What you'll find in SEMA's massive South Hall are the wheel manufacturers, and apparently, the wheel business is a profitable business. Booth after booth house Lamborghinis, Ferraris, Bentleys, and Rolls Royces all shod with audacious rims. (We inquired at several booths, and the vehicles in the booths were all "company" cars, not vehicles procured especially for the show. Apparently, I went into the wrong business. Capitalism at its best, eh?)

The most expensive rims ever?


On our quest to find the ultimate wheel, we found were scores of oversized, overwrought amalgams of steel and aluminum that defy reason. We were getting close.

Today, many manufacturers produce wheels that are 24 inches in rim diameter. Just two years ago, this was a stretch. Along with the veritable commonness of "dubs" and 24s, a handful of companies now produce 30-inch rims. Wheel maker Lexani even produces 32-inch rolling stock. The cost for a set of 32s, shown above, with tires costs a cool $200,000.

Certainly the wheels are expensive, but so are the tires. Lexani's Andy Franko explained the cost behind the 32s. He said, "Yokohama is the only manufacturer who has ever produced a D.O.T. certified 32-tire, and the company has produced only one lot totally 200 units. We bought them all. Exclusivity has its price."

2008 SEMA

2008 SEMA

Enlarge Photo

Surprisingly, the 32-inch rims are not the most expensive rims that Lexani produces. That distinction is reserved for their diamond-encrusted Asantis that cost a cool $1 million per set sans tires. Franko wouldn't comment on how many sets the company has sold.

Franko also showed us his company's largest rim, a 42-inch monster. They produced the rim because they could. The rim, however, is pure hyperbole because it's too large to fit on any vehicle, and no manufacturers make tires so large.

2008 SEMA

2008 SEMA

Enlarge Photo

Trends in rims


The Chevrolet Silverado pictured alongside this story is wearing 30-inch wheels shod with Pirelli 315/30R30 Scorpion tires (several other manufacturers also make 30-inch rubber). Currently, these are the largest production doughnuts available. We're sure the owner of this pickup appreciates the tire's M+S rating, but we couldn't find anybody at the display who could reasonably explain the impetus behind selling an automotive accessory that renders the vehicle undriveable. The turning radius of the Silverado may be wider than Rhode Island, plus rolling over anything sharper than an expelled piece of chewing gum will threaten to crack the virtually unprotected rim.

Regardless of the above, big rims are becoming more common. Tire technology is rapidly advancing (as seen by the performance of the huge Michelin run-flats on the 2009 Corvette ZR1), so the compromises we've come to expect from big wheel/tire combinations may not always be the scourge it currently seems to be.

2008 SEMA

2008 SEMA

Enlarge Photo

Some wheel and tire experts we spoke to at SEMA felt that rim diameter was reaching its practical limit, so the focus is shifting away from just size to the wheel's construction and look. Most of the best large-diameter wheels (22-24 inches) are made from forged aluminum billet. These hunks are then CNC machined. Quality is high, and the lightness of the forged design can offer performance benefits (less unsprung weight is always a good thing). Expect to pay about $1,500 per rim for a high-quality 24-incher.

Posted in:
 
Follow Us

 

Have an opinion?

  • Posting indicates you have read this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use
  • Notify me when there are more comments
Comments (3)
  1. Warning: If you're working in an office do not enlarge the photo.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  2. Is that not just a little over the top have wheels that are more expensive that the whole entire car??? They not even that great either.
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

  3. rims wworth $1 million dollars each, WOW! thats a little over the top. and everyone knows, they will get stolen
     
    Post Reply
    Vote
    Bad stuff?

 

Have an opinion? Join the conversation!

Advertisement
Advertisement
Take Us With You!
   
Advertisement

More From High Gear Media


 
 
© 2014 The Car Connection. All Rights Reserved. The Car Connection is published by High Gear Media. Stock photography by Homestar, LLC. Send us feedback.