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Automakers Making Big Strides in Quality, Says J.D. Power


2008 Chevrolet Malibu

2008 Chevrolet Malibu

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The quality of the typical car, truck, and crossover has reached record levels, according to a new study by J.D. Power and Associates. The annual Initial Quality Study finds “substantial gains” by nearly three-fourths of the 36 ranked nameplates sold in the U.S.



The improvements can be found among American, European, and Asian automakers alike, with owners reporting an average 118 problems per 100 vehicles in the 2008 IQS, a sharp decline from the year before, when the typical ’07 suffered from an average 125 “problems” for every 100 vehicles.



The study--which asks owners to list problems their vehicles experienced after the first 90 days in service--found Porsche to be the most problem-free manufacturer, its vehicles suffering an average 87 problems per hundred, or PP100, in Power-speak. Nissan’s luxury division, Infiniti, jumped from ninth to second in this year’s IQS, with an average 98 PP100. Its archrival, Toyota’s Lexus brand, which long dominated the quality charts, slipped from second to a still-respectable third.



By and large, U.S. automakers held their own, though only the Ford Motor Co.’s flagship Ford brand landed in the IQS Top 10, with an average 112 problems. That was nine fewer defects than in 2007. Four General Motors brands, including Chevrolet and Buick, scored above the industry average 118 PP100, but its Saturn division dropped to 33rd among the 36th brands. Power Vice President Dave Sargent cautioned that Saturn’s poor performance reflected the brand’s flood of new product--which typically fare more poorly than models already in production.



But even there, noted Sargent, “Launches, on the whole, are getting better.” In particular, he pointed to the all-new Chevrolet Malibu, which was named best in the Midsize category, as well as the new Infiniti EX, which scored a victory in the Entry Premium segment.



The overall numbers, Sargent said, are good news for the auto industry” and for consumer, and reflect a general emphasis by manufacturers on driving quality into the assembly process. But manufacturing defects are only part of the quality story, Sargent stressed, emphasizing that the best vehicles are designed to eliminate defects in the first place.



In general, the focus on improved design and manufacturing has paid off, according to the latest IQS results. The survey boils down the responses of 81,500 owners of 2008-model vehicles. They were asked to check off any of 228 possible problems, divided into eight separate categories. Significantly, gains were made in all but one of those categories, that one covering audio, entertainment, navigation, and related electronic technologies.



Makers face a “considerable risk,” said Sargent, incorporating all that new, digital hardware, but it is also a potential plus that buyers are increasingly coming to demand. He foresees a “battleground” as makers look to integrate newer and better technology without running into the sort of problems BMW has often been faulted for with its quirky iDrive controller.



Of the 36 brands included in the 2008 IQS, only seven posted declines, including Chrysler’s Jeep division, which ranked dead last, with 167 problems, or 6 PP100 more than it tallied in 2007. In fact, all of Chrysler’s brands came in well below average. Only slightly better, at 163 PP100, was BMW’s British import brand, Mini. Land Rover, perennially at the bottom of the charts, again came in third to last, with 161 problems.


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Comments (5)
  1. The industry may be obsessed with these stupid, meaningless "INITIAL" Quality numbers, but the CONSUMER has little use for them. Who cares what the initial quality is? After all, all cars are under warranty and even th 4elemons are fixed fro free in their first 3 or 5 or 7 years (some have 10 year warranties!)
    What matters to the consumer is how will the car hold up after 10 and 15 and 20 years and after 150,000 and 250,000 miles? THAT is what separates the proverbial "MEN" from the "BOYS".
    Cars last longer, and people cannot afford to trade them in every year or even every three years any more. Many consumers want to find a reliable, fuel efficient car and KEEP IT FOREVER, or for at least a decade.
     
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  2. Ed,
    95% of people get rid of their card before 90k miles. The longevity benefits second and third owners. Car manufacturers are selling to first owners.
     
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  3. "Gene B
    June 4th, 2008 - 3:31 pm
    Ed,
    95% of people get rid of their card before 90k miles. "
    I challenge that statistic. Do you have a link for it? Then I can check if it is correct.
    Even if it is correct, power's "INITIAL" quality can satisfy only the most short-sighted, thoughtless owners, that cannot look down the road and the alleged 90k miles (in how many years? I once put only 65k miles in 11 years, and then the stupid Pontiac dropped dead). 90k is far from "Initial".
    And in addition, people do not JUNK their cars after 90k miles or x years, they sell them to other people.
    And cars today last far longer than they used to.
     
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  4. Does some has stats for quality after 4 or 5 years ? I think i think it's useful cause we keep our car about 8 years. My saturn sl 2002 has no major trouble. But i d'ont drive everyday and the brakes are rusting and the direction offer resistance.
     
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  5. The IQS studies will become meaningful again when new manufactures from China and India enter the market. They have tons of catching up to do to deliver the quality levels American consumers expect.
    The real untold story here is how much work the Engineers at the American OEMs put in over the last 2 decades to close the gap. They had to focus on quality while management demanded they drive cost out at every turn. I also worked with Honda and was much much more impressed with their management's "if we focus on building a quality car it will pay for itself in sales" attitude.
     
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