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Brace for Impact: First Step to 35 MPG Announced

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The race to meet 35-mpg CAFE standards officially started today as the Department of Transportation laid out the first five-year plan to boost nationwide fleet fuel economy.

The DOT said today that from 2011 to 2015, the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) for both passenger cars and trucks would rise 4.5 percent each year. The "ambitious" proposal, in the DOT's words, would represent a 25 percent improvement in fuel economy provided automakers will meet the targets.

The average fuel economy for the passenger-car fleet would rise from 27.5 miles per gallon to 35.7 miles per gallon by 2015. Trucks would see average fuel economy rise from 23.5 miles per gallon to 28.6 miles per gallon by the end of the five-year phase.

The DOT estimates the new rules will save nearly 55 billion gallons of fuel consumed by vehicles, but did not supply a dollar amount for the toll extracted on the auto industry, which is struggling with the weakest sales year in more than a decade.

Automakers were generally silent on the new rules, though GM did issue a press release. The world's biggest automaker for now said that "GM intends to meet the tough, new national CAFE standards of 35 mpg for cars and trucks combined by 2020, a dramatic increase of 40 percent. NHTSA’s proposed rule lays out the first set of standards toward this target. GM will work with NHTSA throughout its rulemaking process on the yearly targets and the sensible mechanisms needed to meet this challenge.”
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Comments (25)
  1. Why don't GM and the others set up massive dealerships in Canada and Mexico, sell their cars their and peole bring them in second hand. If the states loose all their taxes and jobs leave, then there may be some second thinking on this issue!
     
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  2. Raise the taxes on gas to pay for mass transit systems....then let the consumers decide the fuel economy standards.
     
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  3. I really struggle to understand why you want to object against saving fuel. It just makes sense.

    And the investment in these fuel saving technologies always pays off in the long run. Putting them off just does not make sense.
     
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  4. Who is objecting?
     
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  5. With the modern Diesel, 35 mpg average fleet MPG can be achieved with zero compromise on size or power (torque and acceleration especially) vs the current fleet., and with fewer emisssions. With the possible exception of the most obese SUVs and Pickups people buy but do not need.

    It is long overdue, and with oil at $120, it is not surprising that others want it much higher, 43 mpg etc. and sooner.
     
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  6. I agree with Dave that we should let the consumer drive fuel economy, not CAFE. I suggest shifting taxes away from income and towards fuel (actually consumption in general). Make it so someone who drives an average 35 mpg car sees no overall increase in taxes. Those who want to drive a gas guzzler are welcome to, they'll just have to pay for it.
     
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  7. Oh and Ed, switching to diesels may get you to 35 mpg with no loss of power but by shifting taxes we'd see consumers snapping up smaller more efficient diesel vehicles (55+ mpg are readily available in other countries) and saving money overall. Apply the taxes uniformly to all types of fuel and let the consumer decide.
     
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  8. Tom

    I want to make my point clear, that we can EASILY achieve 35 MPG with NO Sacrifice, maybe a fre $1000s in the price to fit our existing vehicles with MODERN Diesels, as 78% of Europe already does and we should learn from them instead of falsely thinking that all of us need to get these LUDICROUS and NOT very fuel efficient for their size or HP so called "Smart" (but in reality really, really DUMB) minicars that never made a profit in Europe in the decade they have been trying to stuff them down the throats of the Europeans, who can buy a car that seats 5 for the same MPG and the SAME price!

    You like taxes, don't you. They will do wonders especially in this weakened economy thanks to the greedy banks and the even more greedy OPEC.

    And I assume you would give the hard-earned tax $ to the corrupt Congressman and Senator in your state?

    I would not! IF you have any sort of fuel tax, which I Always supported, and in published forum articles in a professional journal back in 1995) but ecpecially when gas was ONE dollar, and we had a HUGE Chance, and your buddy Bubba in the oval office was doing NOTHING to prepare this nation for the future, you could slap a $1 or even $2 tax on gas then and it would still cost less than it costs now, when most of it goes to the Greedy OPEC (and NOT to the Big bad oil cos, as elergy illiterates pontificate),

    I will support such a tax, even a HUGE one, if I am guaranteed that the $ is given back to the taxpayers in the form of reduced income taxes OR partially to pay off our national debt. I do not want my crooks in Congress touching that $, and sure do not want your crooks in Congress touching it either.
     
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  9. Ed, here's what I said.

    "I suggest shifting taxes away from income and towards fuel (actually consumption in general). Make it so someone who drives an average 35 mpg car sees no overall increase in taxes. Those who want to drive a gas guzzler are welcome to, they’ll just have to pay for it. "

    Also from an earlier post I said,
    "Tom L Says:

    April 18th, 2008 at 1:41 pm
    Bill Clinton...squandered such an enormous opportunity. With the prosperity the US was experiencing in the late nineties he could have shifted some taxes from people’s incomes towards consumption. Sure this would have cooled off the economy but it was red hot and could take it. Then we’d have a situation where people could control their financial fortunes. Having a tough time paying your bills? Pay fewer taxes by not buying so much crap. Doing well? Show off to the neighbors by buying that gas-guzzler. Note that the idea is to “shift some” of the taxes. "

    You're response was to say,
    "IF you have any sort of fuel tax, which I Always supported, and in published forum articles in a professional journal back in 1995) but ecpecially when gas was ONE dollar, and we had a HUGE Chance, and your buddy Bubba in the oval office was doing NOTHING to prepare this nation for the future, you could slap a $1 or even $2 tax on gas then and it would still cost less than it costs now, when most of it goes to the Greedy OPEC (and NOT to the Big bad oil cos, as elergy illiterates pontificate),

    I will support such a tax, even a HUGE one, if I am guaranteed that the $ is given back to the taxpayers in the form of reduced income taxes OR partially to pay off our national debt. I do not want my crooks in Congress touching that $, and sure do not want your crooks in Congress touching it either."

    Why are you arguing with me? We're making the same point. Other people reading this post probably think some schizophrenic guy is loggin in under two different name and having a debate with himself.
     
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  10. Yay! The US government is giving us all free lunch!

    Let me get this right, the government wants auto manufacturers to sell more efficient vehicles, and let the manufacturers pay for the development costs themselves, and give the consumers no incentive to buy a new, more expensive, more efficient vehicle?

    Whatever.
     
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  11. "J J Says:
    April 23rd, 2008 at 12:23 pm

    Yay! The US government is giving us all free lunch!

    Let me get this right, the government wants auto manufacturers to sell more efficient vehicles, and let the manufacturers pay for the development costs themselves, and give the consumers no incentive to buy a new, more expensive, more efficient vehicle?"

    If $4.00 a gallon so far has not been a nice enough incentive, perhaps $8.00 a gallon will.

    And the pity is, over in EUROPE, most of the $8 is $ staying IN EUROPE, and NOT, as in the US case, most of it going bacl kto the pockets of THUGS in the Middle East that are blatant supporters of the same Murdering Terrorists that did 9/11.

    I got a huge kick of the selfish pig morons that kept commuting, ALONE, in 10 MPG Suburbans, 100 miles a day, after 9/11, and after giving all that $ to the likes of Osama WITHOUT REALLY HAVING TO, they stuck a dozen US flags on the StupidUglyVehicle in case we (obviously) doubted their patriotism (and common sense as well!)

    Having said all that, Higher CAFE is an IDIOTIC idea, will accomplish NOTHING, but the reason people will buy more fuel effiicent vehicles anyway, if they have a brain and can count, is the HIGH GAS PRICES, as is always the case in economics.
     
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  12. CAFE fixes NOTHING. Automakers have ways around it. Why do you think the HHR and PT Cruiser exist? They are considered trucks.

    Since CAFE was started fuel use has increased every year. CAFE is not the answer.
     
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  13. Ed says:

    I want to make my point clear, that we can EASILY achieve 35 MPG with NO Sacrifice, maybe a fre $1000s in the price to fit our existing vehicles with MODERN Diesels, as 78% of Europe already does and we should learn from them.

    ----

    Are you for real? Did you maybe mean to say that you personally could achieve 35mph with no sacrifice, rather than state that this is universally true for everyone? Maybe you drive some gutless-mobile and therefore wouldn't have any sacrifice switching to diesels. However, diesels in general don't make a lot of horsepower, don't have very high redlines, and are more expensive to produce. Not to mention that they all certainly don't achieve 35mpg.

    If you think you could drop a "modern" diesel into someone's S2000, Corvette, RX-8, etc and they wouldn't notice a thing except the increased fuel economy, you might want to think again.

    I do thank you for using the term "modern diesel" though and not the specious term "clean diesel".

    As far as learning from Europe, again are you serious? Several EU nations tax vehicles based on the displacement of the engine. In the US, "guzzler" taxes are based on the actual consumption. Which one seems smarter to you if your goal is to increase the cost of buying a gas hog? This is part of the reason for diesels, as a smaller displacement diesel can be more acceptable to drive. Additionally many nations either had in the past or have higher taxes on gasoline than diesel, making diesel artificially more attractive.

    And personally, if you asked me to choose between having more CO2 dumped into the air I breath from a gasoline engine, or more carcinogenic particulates from a diesel, I'd choose the gasoline engine emissions every time. Europeans apparently made the opposite choice. Or, their governments made it for them. Thankfully here in the US, I'm still free to make my own choices (though it seems like that's less and less true each day)
     
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  14. First they tell us what to drive..

    Then they will tell us when when we can drive...

    Then they will tell us where we can drive...

    America is over dudes. Capitalism is dead with all these Wall Street bailouts and low interest rates. You can't go anywhere with out having every move being recorded. They tell us how much our toilet can flush, what kind of light bulbs to use, what day to water our lawn.

    Just wait till nationalized health care tells us what we can eat.

    All for our own good.

    Four legs good, two legs bad.
     
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  15. Isn't that my right, Ed, as an AMERICAN, living with the freedom that my ancestors and grandfathers FOUGHT for to drive a vehicle I want? I work hard, I earn my own money (no government programs supporting me!), I take care of my kids and my bills. Why is it wrong that I choose to ride my family and groceries around in safety and comfort in my diesel Excursion (which gets me 22mpg on the highway anyway)? Why should I not be able to own a truck that tows my travel trailer to new exciting places that I can enjoy with my family? Or that I enjoy every sunny day's drive to work in my GT convertible? Somehow it makes me a bad person, a terrorism supporter because I don't want to drive around in a teeny tiny vehicle on highways with semis? That's rediculous fear mongering. And it's ruining car sales.

    What we need to do is get our oil out of our own country more... move the wildlife around in Alaska- they'll adapt. Build more refineries- that's a no brainer. We should be selling the stuff. That would strengthen our dollar and lessen our dependences. And knock it off with the ethanol E85 junk. Look at food prices! You should NOT go to your food supply for such reasons.

    Yes, I think these "greener" vehicles DO make sense. I may even buy one as a commuter car down the road, IF I so choose. I just don't need the government telling me what I can drive. Freedom cannot be left for dead.
     
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  16. " Celeste Says:
    April 25th, 2008 at 11:37 am

    Isn’t that my right, Ed, as an AMERICAN, living with the freedom that my ancestors and grandfathers FOUGHT for to drive a vehicle I want? I work hard, I earn my own money (no government programs supporting me!), I take care of my kids and my bills. Why is it wrong that I choose to ride my family and groceries around in safety and comfort in my diesel Excursion (which gets me 22mpg on the highway anyway)? "

    I commend you for getting the Diesel, it almost gets twice the MPG of the HORRIBLE Gas Excursion. Motorweek test actual MPG long-term 9 mpg gas, 18 MPG diersel

    "Why should I not be able to own a truck that tows my travel trailer to new exciting places that I can enjoy with my family? Or that I enjoy every sunny day’s drive to work in my GT convertible? Somehow it makes me a bad person, a terrorism supporter because I don’t want to drive around in a teeny tiny vehicle on highways with semis? That’s rediculous fear mongering. And it’s ruining car sales."

    It is a known fact that not only we import 64% of our oil from overseas, but also that the Terrorists are funded by petrodollars given by the clueless US consumers to the likes of the Saudis, $ they could have kept in their pockets if they drove a decent vehicle instead, OR drove a bnig vehicle but less miles.



    It is ludicrous to claim you use the excursion for safety (actually it only has PASSIVE safety, NOT active safety that a well-balanced, low and big and heavy BMW 7 series such as mine has), and then commute in the crude, poor handling Mustang (hint: SOLID real axle!!!) convertible!

    "What we need to do is get our oil out of our own country more… move the wildlife around in Alaska- they’ll adapt. Build more refineries- that’s a no brainer. We should be selling the stuff."

    I have no problem with drilling in AK and other places in the US, or, more imortantly, to drill in the Rockies national parks for the harder to get Shale oil, of which we have a trillion barrels. Same with refineries. How about in YOUR back yard? No? Now you know how other localities feel when they do not want one in theirs.

    "That would strengthen our dollar and lessen our dependences. And knock it off with the ethanol E85 junk. Look at food prices! You should NOT go to your food supply for such reasons."

    When did I EVER write in favor of the stupid E85? I always advocate modern DIESELS. Did you confuse me with somebody else?

    "Yes, I think these “greener” vehicles DO make sense. I may even buy one as a commuter car down the road, IF I so choose. I just don’t need the government telling me what I can drive. Freedom cannot be left for dead."

    I never suggested that the Govt tell anybody what to drive. Even the CAFE, which I find SILLY and INEFFECTIVE, still does not forbid you to buy whatever you want. The Automakers will pay a small penalty if they sell too many guzzlers. Some of them have been paying the fine for decades, it is paenuts compared to their proifits (BMW, Merc, Porsche)

    I personally find all big SUVs aesthetically ugly and automotiively illiterate (stability, handling, Rollover proneness, and horrible ACTIVE safety). So do most serious auto enthusiasts.
     
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  17. I've owned three diesels and loved the torque. I've also watched the fuel prices climb in relationship to gasoline. I switched back to a gasoline powered truck for my hauling needs a year ago and have actually cut my fuel bills. My 2004 HD Diesel averaged 19.5 MPG on the highway during my trips between CA and CO. My 2500 HD Gas powered rig recently averaged 17.2 mpg over 3140 miles on a round trip California and Colorado and had no problems in the power department. Factor in that diesel now costs .$97 a gallon more than gasoline where I live in CA and $1.09 more than gasoline where my Colorado Home is located, and my fuel costs have gone down by switching to gasoline.

    We used to be able to count on a higher resale value on a diesel powered trucks but even that is shrinking somewhat. Still, it boils down to driving what is best for you. I'm not going tell someone who needs to haul around 4 or 5 kids to drive a 5 passenger economy sedan. Likewise, if I were still towing my last 5th wheel that weighed in at 14,900 pounds I'd still be driving a diesel. My new 5th wheel weighs a mere 11,300 pounds and my 367 HP gas truck handles it just fine.

    Use your heads and drive what fits your needs. BTW: I don't drive my truck everyday. I also drive a car that averages 28 mpg when I don't need the towing power of my truck. Common sense goes a long way in cutting costs if you look at the big picture. And please, I won't impose my life style on you and all I ask in return is that you don't impose yours on mine - Government included.
     
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  18. I DO have a refinery in my back yard.. I've lived near it all my life. Never caused a problem. There's some traffic involved, and sometimes you can smell it along the highway as you drive by, but honestly, most of us here don't care.

    I'm going to go borrow a really expensive BMW that has all the outstanding driving characteristics that you so love, Ed, and see how it works out when I pile my kids inside and hook up my 30' travel trailer and tow it through the mountains (as I have done with all my Ford trucks).

    And you know what? If you're PAYING ATTENTION, and most folks have a hard time grasping that I do not, I don't have to have my car drive for me. Or truck. Passive, active, whatever, I LIKE it. No, I LOVE it. the Excursion is an awesome, comfortable vehicle. Looks? Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. I can't stand to look at a lot of vehicles that other folks love. That's ok.. we all can't like the same thing. Well, I guess in the direction we're headed, we better all like the same thing because they'll probably regulate looks too.... (haha)

    Listen, I don't want to start a fight. Your points up to the personal attacks are valid. I wouldn't walk into your driveway and insult you for the looks of your vehicles. I got my Mustang as a surprise anniversary present- I've dreamed of it for years. I love the car... it's a brute, yes, but I like that. We can't all drive BMW's. (besides, I support American automakers... insert attack here)
     
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  19. Bruce:

    Don't assume that the current differential between Diesel and Gas prices against Diesel will stay the same for ever. Even in the next few months, as demand for home heating oil evaporates and demand for gas increases (start of the driving season), I expect that differential to grow much smaller. Diesel should be more cost effective on several counts, not just fuel cost per mile driven, and resale value, but also durability and longevity of the engine etc.

    "We used to be able to count on a higher resale value on a diesel powered trucks but even that is shrinking somewhat. "

    VW boasts that its used cars have the highest resale value, even than Hondas and TOyotas, and it is probably not lying, and the reason is the huge increase in the resale value of its diesel used cars.
     
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  20. "I DO have a refinery in my back yard.. I’ve lived near it all my life. Never caused a problem. There’s some traffic involved, and sometimes you can smell it along the highway as you drive by, but honestly, most of us here don’t care."

    You may not care, but most do, that's why we have not biult a new refinery in years, or decades, in the US.

    "I’m going to go borrow a really expensive BMW that has all the outstanding driving characteristics that you so love, Ed, and see how it works out when I pile my kids inside and hook up my 30′ travel trailer and tow it through the mountains (as I have done with all my Ford trucks)."

    I got mine for a mere $10.5k in Oct 05. It cost $75k new, but why buy new? You can find plenty of them (98-01 models) for around 10-15k, the 740iL. You'll get 15 mpg city and 22-24 highway at good speeds.. almost 3 digit speeds.. If you don't care about MPG, you can even get the glorious 12-cylinder 750iL biut its mpg is really lousy.

    I got it from a neighbor, and i wish I drove such a car in the 80s when I bought a brand new pontiac, really a rebadged Opel, with excellent MPG but really very basic transport. But instead I went from new Pontiac to used Honda which lasted me 18 years (will donate it to charity now)

    "And you know what? If you’re PAYING ATTENTION, and most folks have a hard time grasping that I do not, I don’t have to have my car drive for me. "

    I never wanted that either, that's why I always drove manuals, the BMW did not come in a manual. if it did, I'd buy that. And in Europe it comes in a much more fuel efficient 730Diesel. I'd buy that with a manual if I had a choice.

    "Or truck. Passive, active, whatever, I LIKE it. No, I LOVE it."

    You miss the point, the various systems in the BMW make it unnecessary to have another, fwd or 4wd vehicle, for the winter. The driver is very much needed to react well, but if the vehicle is a big hindrance than a help, he or she is screwed re active safety. What will you do if al of a sudden there is an accident scene on the road with an 18 wheeler blocking almost the entire highway? The Excursion will roll over and/or smash into the huge truck, the agile car will go around it. THAT's Active Safety. and you do not need to pay $100k for it. VWs have it too, even Hondas. CARS, that is. Not tall trucks and suvs.

    " the Excursion is an awesome, comfortable vehicle. Looks? Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. I can’t stand to look at a lot of vehicles that other folks love. That’s ok.. we all can’t like the same thing. Well, I guess in the direction we’re headed, we better all like the same thing because they’ll probably regulate looks too…. (haha)"

    I don't mind the looks of the Excursion, and the expedition even looked better. The wife of a friend in San Diego commutes in an Expe many miles a day... she's a bank VP, she can afford $4 gas. I also like it for its height, I do not have to sink myself in the seat, I just parallel park my butt in it. But basically it's a crude vehicle.

    "Listen, I don’t want to start a fight. Your points up to the personal attacks are valid. I wouldn’t walk into your driveway and insult you for the looks of your vehicles."

    Even if you insulted them, I'd not mind, I know the 7 series has stellar looks.. a bit dated and classic, but still holds up very well. The other car, the 18 yr old accord, was also qihte sharp before a hit and run and major rust at places took its toll..but it's 18 years old in the Snowbelt..

    "I got my Mustang as a surprise anniversary present- I’ve dreamed of it for years. I love the car… it’s a brute, yes, but I like that. "

    I like the styling of the latest gen Mustang. (exterior). The convertible looks even better. The interior is a bit too retro for me. but the solid rear axle? (there was a reason for that, but it really hurts handling in an emergency esp.)

    As for American vs Foreign, the Ford Fusion and many other models are made in MExico, the Accord is made in Marysville OH, the BMW 7 was made in germany but many more BMWs are made in Alabama. It's hard to say which is domestic and which is not.
     
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  21. Now it's down to talking points. (you can ride in the Prius as the semi plows into it- )And you STILL can't explain to me how your precious STELLAR BMW is going to haul my trailer. hehe... y'know, no matter what I say here it's going to turn into a personal attack on me and my tastes. Yes, the Fusion is built in Mexico... ever wonder how the rediculous unions here affect the decisions that are made? Yes, it's assembled there.. but FoMoCo is here in the U.S. I see that I am not sophisticated enough for your tastes.. but I simply don't appreciate being called a terrorist supporter by yourself because I choose to drive vehicles in the free wonderful country that I live in that actually suit my needs that I enjoy. And you do the same.

    For now I'm going to take myself and my useless live axle out of the ring and throw the top down with the sun in my face and the wind in my hair and drive to my rural home and watch some NASCAR. Then I'm going to head out to the garage to work on our equally useless hot rod. Followed by a fabulous weekend meal of juicy delicious grilled burgers and beer. Ahhhh.. life in the country.
     
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  22. Ed, all good valid points. I've been driving diesels since 1988 and I really used to enjoy the positive price position of good old #2. The last 2 years however, diesel has cost at least as much as premium and analysts are expecting that to remain the same or grow more expensive. For everyone’s sake, I hope the price of #2 drops like a rock, but it doesn't look like it will, especially as more people start to use it. As for longevity, both the diesel and gas engines will far out live the life expectance of a lot of the other parts of the vehicle. I have found that the costs of transmission replacements, when I used to drive Fords, far exceeded the value of the truck after a few years. Once out of warranty, things like communication failures in the ECM's and other micro processors can cost hundreds of dollars to trace and repair. So, if you do keep a vehicle for 300K or so, then there is a real advantage to a diesel engine. But if you’re like me and replace the vehicle at 150K, then either gas or diesel engines shouldn't suffer any catastrophic failures.

    I think Mercedes is in the best market position to see sales of their new 50 state diesels really take off. After all, their gas rigs require premium fuel and the price differential between the two fuels is far smaller. VW may face a tougher sell however when people start comparing a 45 mpg (Hwy) Jetta against Civics and Corrollas that can get 35 to 38 (Hwy) mpg on regular grade fuel and costs a couple thousand less than the VW.

    Still the bottom line remains, figure out your needs and priorities and buy what you want. Just use your head and drive any of them smart and you'll be surprised how much you can reduce your fuel costs. BTW, I think your response to my post was very professional and on point.
     
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  23. "And you STILL can’t explain to me how your precious STELLAR BMW is going to haul my trailer. hehe"

    I forgot that, but I am a member in an owner's e-mail and web site group on Al & series cars, current and past. Most of them have paid even less for their older 7s than I did, and try to fix them themselves. One major expert in this group, Chris Koch in Buffalo, NY, amazingly uses old 7s as.. his towtrucks. he babies them bu tmakes them last 100,000s of miles.

    I don't know if I would use my 7 this way, but how often do people need SUVs or Pickups with good towing capabilties? If not often, I recommend renting them and commuting in an efficient car instead, esp. if your commute is long. (mine is not)

    The problem is not the owners that use pickups and large SUVs as intended, they have to. The problem is those who used to buy them as fashion statements, instead of minivans largely, or as commuting cars. $4 gas (and maybe $7 later?) should convince most of them to change.
     
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  24. Bruce says: .."So, if you do keep a vehicle for 300K or so, then there is a real advantage to a diesel engine. But if you’re like me and replace the vehicle at 150K, then either gas or diesel engines shouldn’t suffer any catastrophic failures."

    I'm an intermediate case, I keep my cars until they drop dead usually, but do few miles every year with each one, longest one so far is a manual Accord coupe 1990 with 137kmiles I'll donate to charity soon.

    "I think Mercedes is in the best market position to see sales of their new 50 state diesels really take off. "

    And VW, both have experience with them. M-B has already put the 320CDI on all 3 of its suvs and crossovers, the M, the GL and the R class. Big MPG improvement. the E-class bluetec is even better, 34 MPG highway, and quite fast, once I had one in front of me, full with 4 passengers, and I drove the BMW alone (4.4 V8) and the Merc diesel never slowed me down.

    "After all, their gas rigs require premium fuel and the price differential between the two fuels is far smaller. "

    yes.

    "VW may face a tougher sell however when people start comparing a 45 mpg (Hwy) Jetta against Civics and Corrollas that can get 35 to 38 (Hwy) mpg on regular grade fuel and costs a couple thousand less than the VW."

    It still will be a good idea because of the recent huge resale values of the diesel vs the gas VW.

    "Still the bottom line remains, figure out your needs and priorities and buy what you want. Just use your head and drive any of them smart and you’ll be surprised how much you can reduce your fuel costs."

    Sure, I do not recommend the same solution to all.

    BTW, I think your response to my post was very professional and on point

    Thanks... TIme to go now.. on to the Public Library and back home to a super-dinner by my significant other.. she raided Whole Foods with me earlier today...

    Have a nice rest of your weekend.
     
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  25. Good to see that GM is making the move already with the 2009 XFE cobalt (25city / 37 highway) and the volt project. They are also extending XFE to other vehicles. I have no doubt GM will be well ahead of CAFE the whole time.
     
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