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Hyundai Planning Raft of Hybrids

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Hyundai says it will become the next manufacturer to produce a range of hybrid vehicles.

While the Korean car company is busying itself building Sonata sedans in Alabama, and working on a new engine plant nearby, along with a Kia manufacturing facility in neighboring Georgia, it also tells the Wall Street Journal it's planning on launching a hybrid model called the "Avante," starting next year.

The Avante, the Journal says, is to be followed by a mid-size hybrid vehicle by 2010. And by 2012, Hyundai says it will be producing fuel-cell-powered cars, according to the paper.

Hyundai has been producing hybrids since 2004 for use by government agencies, the Journal adds. Worldwide demand for hybrids could reach 1 million units in 2010, Hyundai estimates.

The Avante is expected to be a version of the new Hyundai Elantra, which is due for a major model makeover in the 2009 model year.
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Comments (9)
  1. Incredibly retarded! The first US Hybrid was launched TEN YEARS AGO, the Honda Insight 1999-2000.

    NOW that the hybrids are utterly discredited in Europe, where t he vast majority of cars are MODERN, EFFICIENT DIESELS,


    The fools CEOS at Huyndai, instead of seeing the handwriting on the wall and offer hERE the fine diesels they sell in Europe, they try to develop Hybrids 10 years late??

    And they think the markets will forgive them?

    No wonder they are in such bad shape and fire one US Scapegoat manager after another when they fail once more to realize their sales goals.
     
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  2. From AUTOBLOG.COM: BMW big and heavy 520d blows the prius doors off in MPG!!!!!!

    Readers of London's Sunday Times kept telling the auto reporters that the official mileage numbers for the Prius were overstated by about 15 imperial mpg. Intrigued, the Times decided to test things out by running a Prius against a BMW 520d with regenerative braking from London to Geneva, a 460-mile trip. Then they added 100 miles of urban running to give the Prius a chance to recover ground on its proper turf.

    The verdict: the conventional diesel with Efficient Dynamics beat the full hybrid by 2.2 imperial mpg, or 1.8 US mpg. This means that an executive sedan with all the mod-cons and 500 extra pounds beat the mollusk-shaped sip-tastic wunderkind known as the Prius. And the diesel's CO2 emissions are just 32 g/km higher than the hybrid poster-child, to boot.

    Admittedly, we find the test a bit unfair -- the Prius is not meant show its muscle at "75-mph into a headwind," and adding 100 miles of urban driving doesn't make up for 460 miles of autoroute. Reverse those driving conditions and then let's see who won. Still, for all of us diesel fans out there, it's a feather we won't mind putting in the cap.
     
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  3. Wow, Thor, a little angry are we? I hear more venting from you than anything else. The U.S. is much less forgiving about deisels than in Europe and otehr parts of the world. So much so, that Volkswagon had to pull out of their new line of diesels not too long ago because of the new stringent U.S. diesel laws. In fact, the EPA is planning on setting a timeline for a dozen so states to cleap up their air. Plus, an automotive study showed that the average U.S. consumer would much rather put their hard-earned cash towards a hybrid than a diesel counterpart. I don't necessarily agree, but look at the Prius' sales. It keeps on chugging and so will Hyundai hybrids if they do make them here.
     
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  4. No they will not, regardless where they are made.

    Read ALL my comments again and try to understand them.
     
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  5. I have been the proud owner of several diesel vehicles over the years. Diesel however is no longer the economical bargain that it was few years ago. All debates about cleanliness, eviromental impact and resale value aside, take a look at the modern economics and the strides made by gasoline powered vehicles lately and you may want to rethink buying a diesel powered vehicle.

    My experience rests mainly with the HD class pick up trucks starting back in 1983. I've watched the fuel mileage of newer trucks, regardless of make, slowly decline as new emissions gear get added. Tests results are indicating that the new '08 trucks equipped with soot traps seem to be generally averaging fuel mileage between 16 to 18 mpg on the highway. I made the tough decision to switch to gas and have found that my new K2500 HD with the 6 liter averages only 2 mpg less in real world highway driving than my previous diesel rig. Combine that with an $8500 dollar premium price paid for a new diesel truck and a $.50 a gallon higher price at the pump compared to gasoline, and the economic benefits to diesel really shrinks. I do miss the torque when pulling my 12000 pound 5th wheel, but the gas rig does get the job done. (I do average 3 mpg less when towing than my last diesel got and 2 mpg less that my buddies '08 Dodge Cummings.)

    I have read that as demand for cleaner fuel and an increase in market demand caused in part by more consumers switching to diesel powered cars, the price at the pump is likely to increase even more as compared to gasoline. Perhaps Hyundai introducing some more Hybrids may not as bad an idea as some people think. It is stop gap technology, but if the initial purchasing cost can be kept to a minimum, then I welcome anything that gives buyers more choices, including more diesel models, hybrids or pure electrics. You just got to evaluate your needs and decide for yourselves what will work best for you.
     
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  6. Ok, so I understand what Thor is saying. I too believe that we are better off with the modern diesel's over the hybrid's. The hybrids can be decent, and I do believe that there is a small place in the market. But honestly I think the biggest issue that the diesel in the US faces is some of the highest fuel prices is on diesel. Add the cost of the diesel engine with the higher fuel cost and where does that leave you? I fail to understand why the diesel fuel is more expensive on top of that!

    As far as the consumers putting their hard earned cash into a hybrid, unfortuantely, I think that fact is correct. Too many American's remember the old CRAPPY GM 5.7L diesel, and have a difficult time letting go of that thought, despite the VW and Mercedes diesels that are becoming more popular.

    The other issue that we face is that most of the mfg's aren't putting any money into diesel's in any vehicles except light trucks. We will welcom Audi in the coming year into the diesel market with the Q7, and the upcoming A4, Nissan is coming in withone, Honda is bringing one over....... Why isn't GM and Ford along with Hyundai bringing us any of their euro-diesels????? It's just not fair damn it!
     
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  7. Hybrids vs. diesel - which is better? Depends on how and where you drive. If you drive the highway all the time - go diesel. If you're doing city driving or stop-&-go highway driving in rush hour - Hybrid is the way to go.

    It all depends on how the vehicle is driven - one CANNOT make a general statement that "one is better than the other."

    I drive stop-&-go traffic on the highway everyday - so its easy. Hybrid. FOR ME.

    And just like there are different body types for different people (sedan, wagon, SUV, truck), there are different systems to improve mileage based on different driving conditions (hybrid, diesel, etc).

    One also has to equate the cost of gas vs. diesel, and WHY someone wants better mileage 1) save $$ on fuel cost; 2) do their part to save the environment. And if the sole purpose of buying a hybrid or diesel is option 2 - then the added cost of the system doesnt come into account (i.e. payback for the extra cost).
     
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  8. Uh...has anyone looked at the price of diesel lately? We ALL know that diesels are infinitely more durable, have better torque and longer life; one only has to go to ttac.com to see the review on Prius to know that it's a one-lung, crap handling status symbol driven by NPR-listening flakes. I'll take diesel any day - but if oil keeps spiraling upward and gas hits $5 a gallon, where do you think diesel will be going? The oil companies are currently charging a .50 cent per-gallon premium on diesel. NOW tell me what you think more Americans want to buy.
    Factor in Korean manufacturer warranties and the fact they'll be under-cutting Toyota (and probably offering a better value). Now tell me what YOU think Americans will buy. Anyone who spends time posting to this forum is a passionate driver and lover of cars. 95% of Americans want long-lasting, reliable transportation - the Koreans have proven they can deliver that in spades - they don't give a hoot about blasting from zero to 60 in 4.9.
    In the last two years, I've seen the cars in my office's lot go from GM. Ford and Toyota to Hyundais and Kias. While hybrid drivers haven't gotten the concept of battery disposal through their thick heads, you KNOW where the money is. I drive a Kia Sorento that I love dearly and has done GREAT in Wisconsin winters. Unfortunately ,it sucks gas like you can't BELIEVE. Come Fall, a Hyundai Elantra Touring is my choice -33 Hwy MPG, LOTS of hauling room and enough toys to keep me happy. And my recreational vehicle is a good ol' made-in-Milwaukee Harley Road King.
    Never underestimate the American public - their tastes are largely as whitebread as it gets. The Koreans are only giving us what we want at prices far lower than the Japs with better warranties than the Americans. How smart is THAT?
     
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  9. What about diesel-hybrid ?
     
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