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1999 Tokyo Motor Show, Part II


1999 Honda FCX concept

1999 Honda FCX concept

HONDA FCX A full-size fuel-cell vehicle, there’s plenty of room in the FCX since its very thin fuel cells are stored beneath the floor. The short hood gives the car a dramatic cab-forward stance; inside, the FCX has delicately shaped seats and a futuristic digital dashboard.

1999 Honda Spocket concept

1999 Honda Spocket concept

HONDA SPOCKET From the hood to the tail, the Spocket looks like a sleek, small sportscar. But move the hood back, and it’s quickly apparent that this versatile 2+2 sports coupe can also be configured as a pickup truck with a low tailgate, to enable easy carrying of a motorcycle or mountain bikes.

1999 Honda Neukon concept

1999 Honda Neukon concept

HONDA NEUKON It looks like a Lilliputian bus, and in many ways the Honda Neukon is. With easy access through its doors, there’s room for up to five passengers in a unique 1+2+2 layout, giving everyone room to move. The two central seats can turn around to convert the vehicle into a rolling meeting room.

1999 Nissan XVL concept

1999 Nissan XVL concept

NISSAN XVL Taking center stage at Nissan was XVL, a luxury sedan with cutting-edge technology such as an EXTROID continuously-variable transmission, which uses power rollers instead of the belts common in most CVT systems. XVL is powered by a direct-injection 3.0-liter V-6, and is rear-wheel drive.

1999 Nissan Cypact concept

1999 Nissan Cypact concept

NISSAN CYPACT A nifty, small sport coupe with a direct-injection diesel engine, the Cypact uses a theme of a rounded triangle across its tail, front end, and inside on the stylish dash. Its thrifty engine meets Europe’s magical bogey of 3.0 liters of fuel consumed per 100 kilometers (about 75 mph). Also included in the Net-Gen compact: a mobile personal computer and a navigation system.

1999 Nissan AXY concept

1999 Nissan AXY concept

NISSAN AXY It looks and acts more like a large van, what with its sliding seats, roomy interior, and easy access for a wheelchair. But the AXY is no full-size behemoth, and it’s no fuel hog either: powered by a 2.0-liter direct-injection diesel engine and geared by a continuously variable transmission, it’s bandied as the naturally aware people mover.

1999 Honda Fuya-Jo concept

1999 Honda Fuya-Jo concept

HONDA FUYA-JO Is it the second coming of Darth Vader? This strange, Hooveresque vehicle’s name means "sleepless city." The Fuya-Jo is designed as the radical skateboarder’s automotive nirvana, with barstool-style seating, huge door-mounted speakers, storage racks on the tailgate for skateboards and gear, and possibly the most bizarre styling ever found on a concept vehicle. We’ll put this one up against Nissan’s 1995 concept QIX anyday.

FUTURE LEGACIES What’s the next Subaru family sedan going to be like? Here’s a handful of indicators, starting with the handsome Fleet-X (green and silver), which is 30 percent lighter than the current legacy Touring Wagon through extensive use of alumnium, and more handsome too, we say. Next, the Blitzen (red) is a Porsche-designed B4 Legacy with a neat rear spoiler, a lowered suspension, and a deep air dam. Last on the list, the Super RFRB II, is probably the most accurate predictor of the next Legacy, with its aero front end seemingly production-ready.

1999 subaru Legacy Fleet-x

1999 subaru Legacy Fleet-x

   
1999 Subaru Legacy Blitzen

1999 Subaru Legacy Blitzen

   
1999 Subaru legacy Super RFRB II

1999 Subaru legacy Super RFRB II

1999 Chevrolet Triax concept

1999 Chevrolet Triax concept

CHEVROLET TRIAX The limited success of General Motors’ EV1 battery car shows the risk of putting all your alternative vehicle eggs in one powertrain basket. The Triax prototype is an example of the automaker’s new "multi-option strategy," which could let it shift gears fast in order to reflect changing market conditions — and the emergence of new technologies. At first glance, Triax is just one more of the many car/truck crossover vehicles hitting the auto show circuit these days. But under the skin, it features a modular design that allows GM to plug in any of a variety of energy sources — in this case, battery, gasoline, or a gas/electric hybrid powertrain. "It’s a global vehicle architecture which recognizes regional requirements," said GM Chairman Jack Smith. "It’s designed for high-volume, which would make it much more commercially viable" than previous battery-only electric vehicles. There are no production plans — for the moment — according to Smith, but the modular concept could influence future GM product designs.

 
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