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Volkswagen Touareg

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The Volkswagen Touareg is a mid-size SUV that currently heads Volkswagen's crossover lineup. The Touareg is surprisingly capable, even after having some of its off-road gear removed in the second generation. It has a softer, car-like appearance that lends itself to being easily misunderstood. It competes with the Honda Pilot, Jeep Grand Cherokee, Ford Explorer, and the Toyota Highlander and... Read More Below »
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The Volkswagen Touareg is a mid-size SUV that currently heads Volkswagen's crossover lineup. The Touareg is surprisingly capable, even after having some of its off-road gear removed in the second generation. It has a softer, car-like appearance that lends itself to being easily misunderstood. It competes with the Honda Pilot, Jeep Grand Cherokee, Ford Explorer, and the Toyota Highlander and 4Runner.

MORE: Read our 2014 Volkswagen Touareg review, for more details, as well as photos, specs, and pricing

The first-generation Touareg that was introduced to the U.S. for the 2004 model year looks far more like a tall wagon than a truck; but it actually has more trucklike ability than most modern utility vehicles, with ruggedness for off-roading and impressive trailer-towing ability. Early models were powered by either a 220-horsepower, 3.2-liter V-6 (actually VW's narrow-angle VR6 engine) or a 310-hp, 4.2-liter V-8. Later that year—and also for the 2006 model year, but not for 2005—VW made what is still regarded by some to be the king of the Touareg models: a Touareg TDI model, powered by a turbocharged, direct-injection diesel V-10, making 310 hp and 553 pound-feet of torque, giving the Touareg the ability to tow heavy trailer loads without breaking a sweat.

V-6 Touareg models were a different story entirely; with just 220 horsepower to move more than 5,000 pounds—and not a lot of low-rev torque from the VR6—the engine felt overwhelmed and performance was sluggish even though the six-speed automatic transmission had Tiptronic manual control and did its best. A new 276-hp, 3.6-liter version of the VR6, introduced for 2007, was the first V-6 model to feel adequate. The V-8 models aren't downright fast either, but they accelerate briskly enough and cruise comfortably; they were also upgraded to 350 hp in 2007.

Overall, first-gen Touareg models have impressive interior appointments, room for five adults, and one of the quietest, more refined rides of any utility vehicle. However unlike some other vehicles its size, the Touareg doesn't have a third row of seating. There's also not much cargo space if the back seats are up. Sturdy off-road hardware, with help from modern electronics, is part of the package; the Touareg can handle modest rock-scrambling, along with slick, muddy slopes or loose sand. With an available air suspension, the Touareg offered three different ride heights and was an even more able off-road device. And for all Touareg models, safety is top-notch.

For 2008, Volkswagen renamed the Touareg the Touareg 2, signifying a mild refresh and a revised list of features, including an improved off-road anti-lock braking mode plus new options such as adaptive cruise control and a blind-spot warning system. Truthfully, the Touareg hadn't changed much. In 2009, the Touareg got a more modern, economical V-6 TDI, replacing the big V-10 diesel; although this engine no longer had the semi-like torque output, at 221 hp and 407 pound-feet it was still the best choice for trailer-towing and was rated at 17 mpg city, 25 highway and was 50-state emissions legal this time. The V-8 model was dropped for 2010.

A completely redesigned Touareg, along with a new Touareg Hybrid model, arrived for the 2011 model year. The new model, carried over for the 2012 model year, offers a choice of three powertrains--a base 280-hp V-6, a turbodiesel V-6 with 225 hp and 406 lb-ft of torque, and a hybrid edition with 380 net horsepower. In the 2013 VW Touareg, the diesel engine was reengineered to 240 horsepower and 407 lb-ft, and mileage ratings rose to 19 mpg city, 28 highway—better for most kinds of driving compared to the Hybrid's 20/24 mpg. Features changed very little into 2012 and 2013, with only a few cosmetic differences; the 2013 model year brought new LED taillamps for Hybrid models, most notably.

The diesel and hybrid versions offer impressive fuel economy, but expand the Touareg's substantial pricetag into luxury-SUV territory—plotting it against the likes of the BMW X5. Towing capacity with the Touareg, though, is quite impressive, and VW thoroughly improved the basic design over the first generation with better proportions and styling details. The Touareg remains a five-seat SUV, though, while the related Audi Q7 is a three-row crossover. Cargo space is good, too, and though the ride quality is a little firm, the Touareg gives many high-end shoppers a reason to look down in price without moving down in performance.

A special Touareg X edition was introduced at the 2012 Paris Auto Show. With 19-inch Moab alloy wheels, plus a panoramic sunroof; silver-anodized roof rails; bi-xenon headlamps, darkened taillights, and special logos, this 2013 special edition celebrates the model's tenth anniversary. Then the 2014 Volkswagen Touareg got a sportier R-Line variant offering 20-inch alloy wheels, a unique front bumper, side skirts, LED tail-lights, and oval-shaped dual exhaust tips. Inside, it adds aluminum trim, stainless-steel scuff plates, aluminum sport pedals and an R-Line steering wheel.

An updated Touareg arrives for 2015. Exterior changes were subtle, with the most obvious change being a more aggressive front fascia and revised lighting elements. Cabin materials are upgraded, and there are new active-safety options available. The aim is to help move the Touareg upmarket some to make room for a less costly mainstream three-row crossover that VW will build at its U.S. factory. The unnamed crossover is due within about two years.

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