Scion iQ

The Car Connection Scion iQ Overview

The Scion iQ competes most directly with the Smart ForTwo, and Fiat 500 — which is larger, but almost as easy to park in the city. In other markets the iQ is known as the Toyota iQ and is mostly popular where auto taxes are based on vehicle size, engine displacement and purchase price. 

In the U.S. the iQ is one of the smallest new cars available and demand has been just as tiny. The iQ has continued basically unchanged since its U.S. launch in 2012 and isn't expected to undergo any big alterations any time soon. 

MORE: Read our 2015 Scion iQ review

In the States, you'll see Scion iQs parked at the curb in cities like New York and San Francisco. They make less sense in sprawling cities like Detroit or Dallas. Even for those who like very small vehicles, the full-width occasional rear seat found in a MINI Cooper or Fiat 500 is worth the extra foot or two of length if passengers are ever expected.

Size is, after all, the iQ's unique selling proposition. Though its 10-foot length seems almost toylike next to a compact Toyota Corolla, its stance and attitude make it feel like it could pull off the trick of seating four people. Scion calls the interior arrangement 3+1 seating, since there's more leg room on the passenger side due to a hollowed-out dashboard on that side. An average adult will fit into the third seat, but the fourth seat behind the driver is only for kids--or, more likely, a backpack or bag of groceries.

Since its introduction in 2012, the iQ has offered just one powertrain to U.S. customers. Its 1.3-liter four-cylinder will seem small to most American buyers, as will its 94-hp output, but this is actually a larger engine than most markets receive in this vehicle. The lone transmission is an efficiency-seeking continuously variable unit (CVT). Because of the low power output, the iQ can have some trouble merging with highway traffic, but its small size makes it easy to maneuver in cities and into and out of tight parking spots. The engine is relatively responsive for what it is.

Scion also makes an iQ EV, although green small-car devotees can't purchase one for themselves. These electric iQs are only available to fleets and have a very limited range that wouldn't be useful to most consumers anyway. The EPA quotes a max of 38 miles on a charge, or about half of what most other EVs offer.

Around cities and suburbs, the littlest Scion offers enough power to feel almost frisky, something we've never been able to say of the Smart, with its abrupt, rough, feckless automated manual transmission. The iQ's handling is a magnitude better than the ForTwo, too--it feels well-grounded at highway speeds, though you're keenly aware that you can reach over your shoulder and touch the glass in the hatchback.

Most expect big fuel economy from these little minicars, but the reality is that their small engines and un-aerodynamic shapes return numbers that are only slightly better than cars with back seats like the Fiat 500 or Mini Hardtop. On the EPA's combined cycle, the iQ is rated at 37 mpg, which is 1 mpg better than the similarly sized Smart ForTwo.

Scion positions the iQ as a premium entry in its class--however you define that class--and its starting price of about $16,000 is thousands of dollars pricier than the sub-$13,000 price tag on the Smart ForTwo. Buyers will decide it the extra value is worth it, but there's no doubt that the Scion is a more pleasant place to spend your time behind the wheel. It feels more sophisticated than the Smart, at least in fit, finish, and materials. It's also far less noisy, though the engine will howl under maximum power.

The iQ has been sold in essentially original form since it was launched. For 2015, there are no changes.

The Car Connection Consumer Review

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Tuesday, June 23, 2015
For 2015 Scion iQ

Very pleased with my Scion IQ

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The highway mileage is 49 mpg, whereas the city mpg is 29. The Scion IQ feels like a big car, has an attractive interior and has always delivered reliablity in the last three years I've leased mine. The motor... + More »
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Friday, April 17, 2015
For 2012 Scion iQ

I own 4 cars, this is the one that I prefer to drive, even on long trips.

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It has all the features that I want and is the easiest car to maneuver that I've ever owned. I have no problem merging with traffic on the interstates and it has enough power for most conditions. Driving in... + More »
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