Porsche 911

The Car Connection Porsche 911 Overview

The Porsche 911 is one of the most recognizable cars on the planet, and one of the best performers as well, whether in coupe, cabriolet or targa body style.
 
A car that has rivals in the Audi R8, Chevy Corvette, Jaguar F-Type and even the new Mercedes-AMG GT, the 911 has been the standard-bearer for sports car performance for more than 50 years. It is an icon of both style and performance.
 
 
In base form, the current 911 can be had for about $80,000 but that number quickly climbs past $240,000 with the seemingly endless options available. Most 911 variants retain vestigial rear seating, although some feature seating for just two.

The new Porsche 911

For the 2012 model year, Porsche introduced the 991 series, though it continued sales of some 997 models as well. The new 991 boasts upgraded engines, a new 7-speed manual transmission, a revised Porsche Doppelkupplungsgetriebe (PDK) dual-clutch transmission, a wider front track and longer wheelbase. In addition, the 991 911 is about 100 pounds lighter than the 997. A heavily revised and improved interior makes it the most comfortable yet, and the improvements to the chassis and powertrain make the 991 generation the most high-performance production 911 to date as well.

The Carrera 4 and 4S joined the model lineup in the 2013 model year, in both coupe and cabriolet variants. With a wider rear track than the rear-drive Carreras, the all-wheel-drive Carrera 4 range adds improved traction in foul weather while maintaining the rest of the 911's excellent dynamic characteristics. Also new for 2013 was a standard adaptive cruise control system in PDK-equipped models, as well as forward collision avoidance and a panoramic glass sunroof option.

The 991-based GT3 joined the range at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show, bringing with it a 3.8-liter engine rated at 475 hp, a new GT3-specific setup for its PDK transmission, and rear steering. This track-focused version of the 911 confused some traditionalists with its lack of a manual transmission option, but for those focused on track performance, it made perfect sense.

The highest-power versions of the 911, the Turbo and Turbo S, arrived for the 2014 model year, bringing up to 560 hp and brutally quick acceleration, hitting 60 mph in as little as 2.9 seconds. Both coupe and Cabriolet versions of the 911 Turbo and Turbo S are available.

For 2015, Porsche has added Targa models of the 911 with standard all-wheel drive and either base (Targa 4) or S-level (Targa 4S) powertrains. The 911 GTS made its first appearance in the 991 generation, offering performance above the Carrera S; it will once again be available as a coupe or a convertible and with or without all-wheel drive. The GTS received a 430-hp version of the Carrera S's flat-6 engine and can reach 60 mph in as little as 3.8 seconds with the right equipment. And as if it needed more model variants, Porsche launched a Targa 4 GTS at the 2015 Detroit auto show, combining the Targa body, all-wheel drive, and the GTS's hopped-up engine. This puts the current 911 variant count at 20 and counting.

Porsche has also introduced a new Aerokit package for the 911 Turbo and Turbo S, which adds extra aerodynamic body parts to increase downforce. An adjustable rear spoiler is part of the package, with two settings that increase downforce in different amounts. The kit can be added to a new purchase or retrofitted to a Turbo post-factory.

The 2016 model year saw the addition of a new 911 GT3 RS. It builds on the GT3's specs, offering a lighter body, refined aerodynamics with a huge rear wing, a 500-hp flat-6 engine, and a standard PDK automatic transmission. It is visually differentiated by the aero differences as well as a new take on the front fender vent.

In 2017, Porsche made a major change to the 911's engine lineup. The standard Carrera adopted, for the first time, a turbocharged flat-6 engine. The twin-turbocharged, 3.0-liter flat-6 makes 370 horsepower and 331 pound-feet of torque in Carrera models and 420 hp and 368 lb-ft in the Carrera S.

Despite the downsized engines, both models have significantly improved performance for 2017; the Carrera can now reach 60 mph in 4.0 seconds with the 7-speed dual-clutch transmission (a 7-speed manual is standard)—or just 3.7 seconds with the PDK in the Carrera S. A new Sport Response button also aims for maximum performance and acceleration. Top speed for the 911 is 191 mph in Carrera S form or 183 mph for the Carrera.

Stepping up to the 911 Turbo and Turbo S models brings a similar bump in power over the last generation. The 911 Turbo is rated at 540 hp and the Turbo S makes 580 hp, albeit from different turbocharger setups this time around.

Porsche 911 history

Since 1963, the 911 has seen nearly endless permutations, yet there have been only five major generational changes. The original 911 ran from 1963 to 1989 in its core form with a variety of rear-mounted engines, including turbocharged variants. It established the fastback, sloping hood, and bulging fender look that has defined the car's exterior appearance ever since. The second-generation, 964-series 911 ran from 1989 to 1993. It added four-wheel drive as an option, an automatically deploying rear spoiler, anti-lock brakes, and power steering. These all served to improve handling, performance, and daily usability, but somewhat softened the 911's image. The third generation, or 993-series, 911 saw an all-new front- and rear-end treatment, though the spirit of the original still showed through. A new multi-link rear suspension improved handling, and the chassis was improved for further gains. This was the final generation that used an air-cooled engine.

The fourth-generation, 996-series 911 moved to a water-cooled engine, but kept the famous flat-six layout. It also was the first complete redesign of the 911's exterior—each body panel was different, yet added up to a look that still adhered to the classic 911 formula. All-wheel-drive, rear-wheel-drive, turbo, twin-turbo, GT3, and GT2 variants offered a wide variety of performance options that all relied on the same core underpinnings.

The 997 series of the 911 Carrera began its run in 2005. Initially offered with a 3.6-liter flat-6, the 997 911 upgraded to a 3.8-liter engine in the Carrera S. Available in both coupe and cabriolet forms, the 997 911 could be had in no fewer than 17 variants, including the Carrera, Cabriolet, Targa, and Turbo each offering all-wheel-drive and sportier "S" variants, plus the GT3, GT3 RS, and GT2 RS. This wide variety of models ranged in output from 345 hp in the base Carrera to 620 hp in the GT2 RS. Transmissions available included a 6-speed manual and a 7-speed dual-clutch PDK. The name translates very simply—and logically—to Porsche dual-clutch gearbox.

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February 23, 2016
2016 Porsche 911 2-Door Coupe Carrera 4

Great car.

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Excellent daily driver. As it all wheel drive, I use it all year round. Quite comfortable on long trips and more cargo room then would expect. I'm 6'2" and there is more than enough room for the driver and... + More »
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June 26, 2016
2015 Porsche 911 2-Door Cabriolet Carrera GTS

The greatest driving pleasure you could imagine.

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This is one awesome sounding and performing car. I live on the ridge of Mt, Tamalpais at 1200 ft with some of the most beautiful windy, curvy mountain roads with ocean views. The 911 GTS is the perfect car for... + More »
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February 5, 2016
2015 Porsche 911 2-Door Coupe GT3

Better than even highest expectations

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Traded up from a 2007 GT3, which was one of the better 997 varieties; the 991 GT3 is so far superior that it is in a totally different league. My lap time at Sebring reduced so much that I could hardly believe... + More »
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