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Nissan Pathfinder

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The Nissan Pathfinder has been Nissan's mid-size utility vehicle since the 1980s. It's changed pretty radically over the decades, reincarnating itself from rugged SUV roots into a polished crossover vehicle capable of seating up to eight passengers. Once one of the toughest SUVs around, the Pathfinder's now one of the most carlike wagons on the road. Older and tougher Pathfinder competed more... Read More Below »
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Nissan Pathfinder
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New & Used Nissan Pathfinder: In Depth

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The Nissan Pathfinder has been Nissan's mid-size utility vehicle since the 1980s. It's changed pretty radically over the decades, reincarnating itself from rugged SUV roots into a polished crossover vehicle capable of seating up to eight passengers. Once one of the toughest SUVs around, the Pathfinder's now one of the most carlike wagons on the road.

Older and tougher Pathfinder competed more against the off-road-capable Jeep Grand Cherokee and Toyota 4Runner. Competitors for the latest Pathfinder include the GMC Acadia and Chevy Traverse, the Honda Pilot, the Toyota Highlander, and the Ford Explorer.

MORE: Read our 2015 Nissan Pathfinder review

When that first Pathfinder was launched back in the '80s, it was a hardscrabble truck model with a very basic interior, crude appointments, and a rough ride. It wasn't until 1996 that it began to take on trappings of passenger friendliness. The previous-generation Pathfinder had been closely related to Nissan's Hardbody compact pickup, but that mid-Nineties Pathfinder traded the truck-based body-on-frame design for a new unibody with better ride and handling—though it still shared its 168-horsepower, 3.3-liter V-6 with the pickups.

Things changed significantly in 2001 when the Pathfinder got a more modern engine. A 3.5-liter V-6 making 240 hp arrived to solve the power problem. While the Pathfinder was still capable off-road, the Xterra joined it in the Nissan lineup, offering a more rugged alternative to the Pathfinder, which was slowly getting more civilized. The Pathfinder retained its ability to tow and somewhat stiff suspension, however, as well as its tight rear seat.

Before the current model, the Pathfinder had last been completely redesigned for 2005, returning to body-on-frame construction that was once again closely related to that of the Frontier pickup, along with the Xterra. A 270-hp, 4.0-liter V-6 was standard, providing plenty of power for most needs, but a 310-hp, 5.6-liter V-8 was optional beginning in 2008. Those tempted by the V-8 in used examples should be forewarned that fuel economy is particularly atrocious with this engine.

That newly optional V-8 was accompanied by a design overhaul for the 2008 model year. Nissan gave the Pathfinder's front end a slight visual adjustment and made upgrades to the interior that year. The crossover saw few big changes through the 2012 model year, although SE Off-Road models were sold in 2008 and 2009 with features aimed at trail enthusiasts, including a skid-plate package, off-road tires, and Bilstein dampers.

The brand-new Pathfinder that arrived for the 2013 model year is a more carlike crossover vehicle. It shares some of its running gear with the smaller Nissan Murano, including the 260-hp V-6 engine with continuously variable transmission (CVT). It's offered with standard front-wheel drive or optional four-wheel drive (really all-wheel drive, but with a 4WD Lock mode). The latest Pathfinder handles and responds well on streets and highways, and trades the earlier models' towing and off-roading abilities for on-road ride and comfort, versatility, and seating space for seven.

A new Pathfinder Hybrid crossover was added to Nissan's lineup for the 2014 model year. The six-cylinder engine found in other versions is replaced in the Hybrid by a 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine with supercharging and an add-on electric motor good for 15 kilowatts of power (22 hp equivalent). The motor is located between a modified CVT and the engine, and the two power sources combine for a net of 250 hp. Unlike some other hybrids, the gas-electric Pathfinder can't run on electric power alone, but the assistance the motor provides helps to improve gas-mileage ratings by about 20 percent. That said, the Pathfinder Hybrid feels noticeably slower than the V-6 model, so it's certainly a trade-off.

For the 2015 model year, Nissan made only a few changes to the Pathfinder.

Used Nissan Pathfinder Models

Until 2013, the Nissan Pathfinder was a rugged, truck-based sport utility vehicle. It’s now been recast as a three-row, seven-passenger crossover, but used Pathfinders will be the old, tougher model. In 2001 it gained a 3.5-liter V-6 as standard; with a 2005 redesign, that became a 4.0-liter V-6. All Pathfinders through 2012 retain their off-road ability and strong towing ability, at the expense of a hard, choppy ride and distinctly truck-like handling.
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