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Nissan Murano CrossCabriolet

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2014 Nissan Murano CrossCabriolet Photos

The Nissan Murano CrossCabriolet, one of the more unusual crossover vehicles ever offered in the U.S., was sold for four model years: 2011 to 2014. With the complete redesign of the regular Murano five-door crossover for the 2015 model year, the CrossCabrio faded away and is not likely to be replaced. Twenty or thirty years hence, it'll still be the answer to a car trivia question--or the prime... Read More Below »
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Nissan Murano CrossCabriolet
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New & Used Nissan Murano CrossCabriolet: In Depth

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The Nissan Murano CrossCabriolet, one of the more unusual crossover vehicles ever offered in the U.S., was sold for four model years: 2011 to 2014. With the complete redesign of the regular Murano five-door crossover for the 2015 model year, the CrossCabrio faded away and is not likely to be replaced. Twenty or thirty years hence, it'll still be the answer to a car trivia question--or the prime entry in a list looking back at "Whatever were they thinking?" cars.

The Murano CrossCabrio was a soft-top two-door convertible adapted from the unlikely starting point of  a five-seat, five-door crossover utility vehicle with all-wheel drive. It was a niche car par excellence, one that offered a unique take on open-air driving, despite its tendency to puzzle even other Murano drivers.

See our full review of the 2014 Nissan Murano CrossCabriolet for more information, including options, prices, and specifications.

From the windshield back, the CrossCabrio's designers sliced off the standard Murano roof and substituted a pair of much longer side doors. The result is a tall, high-riding convertible with a stance and appearance unlike anything else on the roads. From the front, it looked mostly like a standard Murano--but that was it for familiar lines.

It was the sole crossover offered with a cloth top aside from the Jeep Wrangler, whose legendary rock-climbing and river-fording abilities (not to mention its military heritage) appealed to a hugely different set of buyers than the lady real-estate brokers we've seen behind the wheel of the soft-top Murano. You might have to go back as far as the tiny, oddball Suzuki X90 targa-topped all-wheel drive two-seater to find something quite as unusual as this car.

Unfortunately, the CrossCabrio lost quite a lot of interior space to the packaging for the cloth convertible top. The driving position is good, and the Murano's well-organized interior is trimmed in woodgrain and leather for the ritzier convertible. The doors are long, and swing open in a wide arc, which makes entry and exit easier than it might have been--unless you're in a tight parking space. But the back seat is for homecoming queens only; there's neither leg nor shoulder room enough to seat two full-size adults. The trunk's small when the top is stowed, with only enough room for a couple of small suitcases, but it doubles when the roof is raised and latched.

The CrossCabriolet's drivetrain was Nissan's familiar 3.5-liter V-6 engine, producing 265 horsepower, mated to its continuously variable transmission (CVT), just as in the standard Murano. The combination provided a steady, unsurprising stream of power that's smooth and well quieted in this iteration. Fuel economy stays relatively high, at 17 mpg city and 22 mpg highway, despite the added weight of all-wheel drive and structural reinforcements.

On the road, the CrossCabriolet had the same ride height as the stock Murano crossover. It has fairly responsive steering, but its ride was softer, and the convertible version bounded more, with less damping and more quiver in the body structure itself.

The all-wheel drive system, in fact, was standard on the Murano CrossCabriolet, which helped move the greater weight of the convertible--not to mention helping to beef up its body structure. The suspension was also refined and re-calibrated to accommodate the changes to the body as well. That convertible top, by the way, was so massive that it came with its own sunroof--a glass panel that folded away neatly with the top.

Launched in 2011, the Nissan Murano CrossCabriolet carried over largely unchanged for 2012. Changes for 2013 included a pair of new paint colors and a new design for the 20-inch alloy wheels. Just one model is offered, with limited options. Standard equipment includes heated seats, a rearview camera, satellite radio, and Bluetooth and USB connectivity. In 2012, Nissan dropped the previously standard navigation system and cut the price by $1,850. The Murano CrossCabriolet still usually left the lot at $45,000 or more, proving once again that beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

If nothing else, it was a vehicle that turns heads and starts conversations. That's often desirable in southern California, which is where most of the few CrossCabrios we've seen in the wild have been located.

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