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Nissan Maxima

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The Nissan Maxima was Nissan's original "four-door sports car"--at least, in was in its distant past. More an upscale alternative to the family four-door Altima, the Maxima is now a bridge between mainstream and luxury, a competitor for cars like the Buick LaCrosse, Lincoln MKZ, and Acura TLX. Formerly built in Japan, the Nissan Maxima is now built alongside the mechanically similar Nissan Altima... Read More Below »
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Nissan Maxima
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New & Used Nissan Maxima: In Depth

2014 Nissan Maxima

2014 Nissan Maxima

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The Nissan Maxima was Nissan's original "four-door sports car"--at least, in was in its distant past. More an upscale alternative to the family four-door Altima, the Maxima is now a bridge between mainstream and luxury, a competitor for cars like the Buick LaCrosse, Lincoln MKZ, and Acura TLX.

Formerly built in Japan, the Nissan Maxima is now built alongside the mechanically similar Nissan Altima at the company's sprawling Smyrna, Tennessee, assembly plant.

The Maxima has been on the U.S. market for more than 30 years. Now in its eighth generation, it remains at the top of the Nissan sedan lineup, as it has been since the company switched its name from Datsun to Nissan.

From 1976-1980 the Datsun 810 preceded the Maxima in all but name in the U.S., with an in-line six-cylinder engine and rear-wheel drive. The second generation (1981-1984) maintained the same specs, but adopted the Maxima badge worldwide and midway through its life cycle, switched to the Nissan nameplate.

For the latest information, including specs and related news, see our 2014 Nissan Maxima review. 

The third-generation Maxima sharpened its image with a radically squared-off body. Sold from 1985 to 1988, it switched to front-wheel drive and carried some high-tech features to distinguish it from the smaller Stanza, including a suspension that self-adjusted based on road conditions. it also came in a wagon version--and offered a manual transmission, an unusual option in its class.

In its fourth generation, from 1989-1994, the "four-door sports car" era of the Maxima began. This version of the sedan regularly won best-of comparison tests thanks to nimble handling from an independent suspension, and a V-6 engine shared with 300ZX sports car. An SE edition tightened handling even more, and added touches like white-faced gauges to distinguish it from base versions. The same fundamentals were reworked for the 1995-1999 Maxima, but the styling was softened and the rear suspension was made simpler, revoking some of its sporty credentials though it still was offered with a manual transmission. The latter fifth generation Maxima was sold, with some trim changes, as the Infiniti I30. In the sixth generation, the body was redesigned again and in due course, it gained a new 3.5-liter V-6 with 255 horsepower, as well as a six-speed manual option.

Dramatic change came to the Maxima in the two most recent generations. The seventh-generation car, sold from 2004-2008, kicked off production in the U.S. Styling was rebooted to match the performance of its 265-hp V-6 and manual transmission, but it did have some controversial graphic notes, mostly on its eggcrate grille. This Maxima shared its architecture with the Nissan Altima, which had grown to the size of the Maxima in most interior dimensions. A midcycle refresh in 2007 left the Maxima without its manual transmission option, while Nissan fitted a new continuously variable transmission (CVT). Front-end styling grew more conventional, and the Maxima piled on luxury features like pushbutton start and a distinct interior.

The most recent Maxima was introduced as a 2009 model. The muscular styling has been more successful at distinguishing it from the Altima, and the interior design has its own cues, too--there's an unusual low cowl, with a band of trim outlining the base of the windshield. The Maxima's new 290-hp 3.5-liter V-6 offers extremely smooth acceleration, and while it's no manual, the CVT provides a sport mode and good fuel economy of 19/26 mpg. The Maxima still has one of the sportiest suspension calibrations for a front-wheel-drive sedan, and a firm yet supple ride, allowing good handling response without sacrificing comfort. It's roomy in front, but the back seat can feel tight, especially compared with the Altima.

The current Maxima's crash ratings have fallen some as testing standards have been added and made tougher, while the model has remained largely unchanged. The usual safety features are present, including front side and curtain airbags, active head restraints, anti-lock brakes, and stability control. Standard items also include steering-wheel audio controls, Bluetooth connectivity, dual-zone climate, proximity key with pushbutton start, and a power moonroof.

Today's Maxima has seen very few changes over the past several years. The 2010 model year brought a new Sport package with a sportier suspension tune, 19-inch wheels, paddle shifters for the transmission, unique front seats, and some other changes. A Special Edition package launched for 2012 included a rear spoiler, smoked lighting lenses, unique silver wheels, and other aesthetic tweaks along with HID headlights.

Nissan is extending the 2014 model year for the Maxima, and skipping the 2015 model year as it prepares for a new sedan to take over the name in its lineup. It showed a Maxima concept sedan at the 2014 Detroit auto show, and is reaching into its past to rekindle the Maxima's sporty reputation by restoring a 1996 sedan it bought on Craigslist.

Used Nissan Maxima Models

Over nine generations, the Nissan Maxima has been one of the sportiest mid-size sedans in the class. Known recently for dramatic styling, it’s been built in the U.S. since 2004. The front-wheel drive sedan features a 3.5-liter V-6 engine paired with the company’s continuously variable transmission (CVT), although if you want a manual, you’ll have to look at Maximas from 2006 or earlier. The current Maxima dates to 2009, so used models since then look like the brand-new vehicle.
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