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Mazda MAZDA5

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The Mazda 5 is a minivan—just one that's a fraction of the size of anything else on the market that bears that classification. Currently the Mazda5 is based on the underpinnings of the previous-generation Mazda3 compact-car family. It's a minivan for those who are fond of driving; what it gains in handling, it loses in interior space. For more information on the Mazda 5, including options... Read More Below »
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New & Used Mazda 5: In Depth

2014 Mazda Mazda5

2014 Mazda Mazda5

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The Mazda 5 is a minivan—just one that's a fraction of the size of anything else on the market that bears that classification. Currently the Mazda5 is based on the underpinnings of the previous-generation Mazda3 compact-car family. It's a minivan for those who are fond of driving; what it gains in handling, it loses in interior space.

For more information on the Mazda 5, including options, pricing, and specifications, see our full review of the 2014 Mazda 5.

The Mazda5 has been offered in the U.S. market through two different generations. First-generation Mazda 5 models ran from 2006 through 2010. In 2008, a five-speed automatic transmission replaced the former four-speed automatic, but it used a 153-horsepower, 2.3-liter four-cylinder engine throughout its run. The new transmission boosted fuel economy, but proved only slightly more responsive in acceleration. Other improvements that year included a redesigned center stack and some instrument-panel improvements, plus backseat climate controls and vents.

The current Mazda 5 was redesigned in 2012, and the styling of the latest model is considerably more adventurous, with lines based on the 'Nagare' design language of swoopy, almost aquatic shapes. The tailgate has a more carlike design than it did in the last generation, and the Mazda 5's front styling may have the most extreme version of Mazda's 'grinning' corporate grille design. With luck, it'll likely be toned down in years to come, to follow the example of the Mazda 3.

Because the Mazda 5 is one of the smaller vans, its seating arrangement isn't what you get from a larger minivan. The 5 offers seating for six, split into three rows of two seats. In the first and second row, that means individual bucket seats, while row three gets a bench. The second row can be moved forward and back to accommodate bigger people or more stuff, and also aid entry into the third row. The rearmost rows can also fold to allow for cargo hauling.

While its dimensions make it a seven-eighths-scale minivan, from behind the wheel, it maneuvers and handles like a small car. And it doesn't require any more space to park than a compact car either. One downside to the Mazda5, though, is a noisier interior than you'd encounter in most other vehicles of the type. It feels very carlike—and it can be quite peppy when driven hard, provided you're not carrying a full load. But load up the Mazda 5 and its engine will strain--especially if you opt for the automatic transmission.

Mazda offers just one engine, a 157-horsepower, 2.5-liter four, but sporting drivers can order it with a six-speed manual gearbox instead of the five-speed automatic that's also offered. Excellent steering with superb road feel, tight control of body motions, and a light driving feel makes the Mazda5 sheer fun to drive--and when's the last time that could be said of any minivan at all? Although you can row the automatic manually through the gears, the standard manual gearbox on the Mazda 5 makes it more fun to drive. While the Mazda 5 doesn't accelerate quickly, handling is a strong point; even loaded up, it can take on a curvy road with a surprisingly nimble and stable feel.

Trims and upholsteries have been upgraded over the previous generation, though we still found them to feel cut-rate up close. Some shoppers will also resent the lack of Bluetooth connectivity on some trim levels, and the lack of a navigation option. For 2013, Mazda did add a USB input as well as side mirrors with integrated LED turn-signal indicators. Changes have been minimal since then, but in summer 2014 the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) tested a 2014 model and found that it didn't fare well in several categories. In particular, it rather spectacularly failed the tough new small overlap frontal test.

The Mazda 5 is virtually alone in the U.S. market, making it the only entry in a category of vehicles variously known as "small minivans" or "people movers" to Europeans. The Kia Rondo is no longer offered, and Ford canceled plans to launch its seven-seat, non-hybrid C-Max when sales failed develop. You can still buy a Ford C-Max, but now it's only offered as a hybrid or a plug-in hybrid--a different vehicle category that may exceed the price range of some families who might consider a Mazda 5.

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