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Mazda CX-5

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The Mazda CX-5 is a compact crossover utility vehicle that can seat up to five passengers. The replacement for the CX-7, the CX-5 was new for the 2013 model year. Currently the littlest CUV from Mazda, it will be joined by the smaller CX-3 for 2016. Rivals for the CX-5 include the similarly sized Ford Escape, the Honda CR-V, and the Toyota RAV4. MORE: Read our 2015 Mazda CX-5 review As a handsome... Read More Below »
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New & Used Mazda CX-5: In Depth

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The Mazda CX-5 is a compact crossover utility vehicle that can seat up to five passengers. The replacement for the CX-7, the CX-5 was new for the 2013 model year. Currently the littlest CUV from Mazda, it will be joined by the smaller CX-3 for 2016.

Rivals for the CX-5 include the similarly sized Ford Escape, the Honda CR-V, and the Toyota RAV4. 

MORE: Read our 2015 Mazda CX-5 review

As a handsome and practical crossover utility vehicle, the CX-5 offers better-than-average space and flexibility inside, married to excellent roadholding and surprisingly high gas mileage in real-world usage. The tradeoff is some loss of power under maximum acceleration with the standard engine, but a new and more powerful 2.5-liter engine in Touring and Grand Touring models finally gives it the acceleration to match its athletic handling.

The Mazda CX-5 is the very first Mazda designed to utilize what the company calls its SkyActiv design principles. In essence, that means the entire vehicle is optimized around a single, highly efficient engine. The same basic architecture ahs been used on the Mazda 6 and Mazda 3 since then. Despite the roominess inside, the base CX-5 is powered by only a 155-horsepower, 2.0-liter four, producing 150 lb-ft of torque, which can be ordered either with a six-speed manual gearbox or a six-speed automatic. If you want all-wheel drive, you can get it with any trim level--which we applaud--but only with the automatic transmission.

From the outside, the CX-5's lines are typically Mazda. The styling marries a swoopy profile and strong accent lines to a restrained but still aggressive trapezoidal grille and relatively slim headlamps that are swept back into the fenders. It's a sporty look for a crossover, though rear three-quarter vision is hurt by the rising beltline and tiny triangular third window on each side. And it's a shape surprisingly sensitive to color choice. Certain shades--dark grey is one--belie the crossover's body height and make it look almost svelte, though others show the tall doors all too plainly.

While certainly attractive, the CX-5 really stands out for its excellent handling. It acts more like a large hot hatch or a sports sedan than it does a crossover; sharing much with the Mazda 6 sedan, it feels very similar, just with a different point of view on the road. There's little roll in cornering, the steering has the right amount of effort and decent feedback, and there is ample grip to push it on on-ramps. If you feel you must have a crossover for family reasons, this is the way to go to avoid having fun on the occasional back road or even your commute.

Inside, the driver sits high, but not as high as in some competitors. Mazda says seat height is exactly halfway between a standard sedan and the typical crossover, which we think is a good compromise. The dashboard is straightforward and handsome, with soft-touch materials on most surfaces. Seats are comfortable and there's a lot of rear legroom with the front seats positioned for six-foot occupants. The load deck is surprisingly large, and a clever articulated seat mechanism moves the rear-seat cushion forward and down when the seatback is folded forward--giving a lengthy and completely flat load floor.

The SkyActiv powertrain delivers remarkable fuel efficiency. Both front-wheel-drive versions are EPA-rated at 29 mpg, with the all-wheel drive model (automatic only) dropping to 28 mpg. But we did much better than that, as Mazda quietly says many drivers will. Over a weekend road test, our all-wheel drive CX-5 delivered 33 mpg. The downside of the small engine and high efficiency, though is that in circumstances where sudden power is needed, the driver has to floor the accelerator and downshift two or even three gears--or wait for the automatic to do it. The power is there in most cases, but the CX-5 can be reluctant to give it up.

Mazda offers three trim levels: the base Sport, the mid-level Touring (which Mazda says will provide the bulk of CX-5 sales), and the high-end Grand Touring. Prices start at $20,695 plus delivery, a relatively low figure for a capacious crossover with this much fun-to-drive quotient.

The CX-5 comes with only six airbags, but it has already been named a Top Safety Pick by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) gives it four stars out of five overall, with four stars on the frontal and rear crash safety tests, and five stars on side impact. The CX-5 has the usual suite of electronic safety systems, and particularly good forward visibility--regrettably offset by particularly bad rear three-quarter visibility. While a blind-spot notification system and a reversing camera are optional on higher trim levels, this is one car where we think they should be standard on all models.

Just a year after its launch, the CX-5 got a solid update for 2014. The most obvious change was the addition of a larger engine for higher trim levels; Sport models retain the 2.0-liter, while Touring and Grand Touring CX-5s use a 2.5-liter SkyActiv four-cylinder that delivers 184 hp. The bigger engine takes a second off the 0-to-60-mph time and only gives up 1 mpg in the EPA's combined rating, while bringing the power that some thought was lacking from the 2013 models. The 2014 model year also brought Smart City Brake Support collision avoidance to the Tech Package, which can automatically apply the brakes at speeds between 4 and 19 mph. Changes for 2015 were relatively few by comparison.

Yet another CX-5 update is on tap for the 2016 model year, this time mostly concerning aesthetics and features. The front end is revised, with a new grille and modified headlight design. Interior materials have been upgraded, and the infotainment system adopts the interface first shown on the Mazda3, including the available head-up display. Mazda also is adding some more active-safety features, such as radar cruise control.

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