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Land Rover LR2

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The Land Rover LR2 is a compact to mid-size crossover SUV, the smallest vehicle in Land Rover's lineup save for the more stylish Range Rover Evoque. With a fair amount of off-road capability and good road manners, the LR2 is a rival for vehicles like the Mercedes-Benz GLK-Class, BMW X3, Audi Q5, and the Volvo XC60. The LR2 replaced the Freelander in the U.S. for the 2008 model year, with a more... Read More Below »
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Land Rover LR2
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New & Used Land Rover LR2: In Depth

2013 Land Rover LR2

2013 Land Rover LR2

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The Land Rover LR2 is a compact to mid-size crossover SUV, the smallest vehicle in Land Rover's lineup save for the more stylish Range Rover Evoque.

With a fair amount of off-road capability and good road manners, the LR2 is a rival for vehicles like the Mercedes-Benz GLK-Class, BMW X3, Audi Q5, and the Volvo XC60.

The LR2 replaced the Freelander in the U.S. for the 2008 model year, with a more grown-up feel and better alignment with the Land Rover lineup. It was one of the first models to be separated from the more upscale Range Rover line once the Range Rover Sport was added. The LR2 initially shared its single powertrain offering with the Volvo S80, coming on line just as Ford's ownership of the two brands was drawing to a close.

MORE: Read our 2014 Land Rover LR2 review

From the 2008 through the 2012 model years, the LR2 came with a 3.2-liter in-line six-cylinder engine that launched it to 60 mph in about 8.4 seconds, within the range of other compact luxo-utes. The engine came coupled to a six-speed automatic with clean, effortless gear shifts, and it offered a manual-shift and a sport-shift mode. The LR2's Haldex all-wheel-drive system moves power around to all four corners, but it lacks the low transmission range of the rest of the Land Rover lineup. The LR2 does have more than 8 inches of ground clearance, though.

The steering wasn't quick or particularly communicative on earlier models, but the Land Rover LR2 maneuvered very easily in parking lots, tight city streets, and narrow country roads alike, and it cornered with little of the lean or drama of larger, heftier, and more trucklike SUVs. It also has had a balanced ride quality. The interior has enough room for adults--just enough in the back seat--and enough cargo room for a few roll-aboard suitcases.

With only minor changes in its first five years on the market, the LR2 received a mid-cycle makeover for the 2013 model year. It still sports the crisp lines that distinguish it from the softer Audi, Volvo and BMW utes, and it's easily recognizable as a part of the Land Rover heritage on a smaller scale. What's different at first glance isn't obvious outside--new headlamps and reframed grille--but a new interior drastically reduces the clutter inside the LR2, cutting down on the jumble of buttons that marked the earlier models. A new touchscreen and new gauges offer clearer displays, and Meridian sound is now the standard audio setup.

The more important changes come beneath the skin. The in-line six is gone, replaced by a 240-hp 2.0-liter turbo four shared with the Range Rover Evoque--which was developed from the LR2's architecture. Lighter than the outgoing engine, it's also more powerful and offers more torque lower in the rev range--and with a new undertray that adds support beneath the engine, there's better noise and vibration control than in the Evoque. The LR2's now quicker by a couple of tenths, noticeably quieter and more responsive, and steers more quickly than before.

Crash-test scores aren't available for the LR2. It offers side curtain airbags and stability control with anti-roll software built in; a rearview camera is now standard, and useful, since the thick rear pillars make visibility more of a problem than in larger Land Rovers that seat the driver higher.

The LR2 is carried over into the 2015 model year essentially unchanged.

The Land Rover LR2 will be indirectly replaced in the 2016 model year by a new Land Rover Discovery Sport, which was introduced at the 2014 Paris Auto Show. The new Discovery Sport rides on the same LR-MS platform underpinning the Range Rover Evoque. Prototypes for the new Discovery Sport are now in the final stage of development and production will take place at Jaguar Land Rover’s Halewood plant in the U.K., the same site responsible for the Range Rover Evoque.

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