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Buick Verano

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The Buick Verano is a four-door sedan that shares its architecture and some running gear with the Chevy Cruze. It's a more finely finished rendition, though, with more premium features and its own four-cylinder engines--with the requisite higher sticker price. The Verano was introduced for the 2012 model year. Few major changes have been made since then, aside from the addition of a turbocharged... Read More Below »
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New & Used Buick Verano: In Depth

2015 Buick Verano

2015 Buick Verano

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The Buick Verano is a four-door sedan that shares its architecture and some running gear with the Chevy Cruze. It's a more finely finished rendition, though, with more premium features and its own four-cylinder engines--with the requisite higher sticker price.

The Verano was introduced for the 2012 model year. Few major changes have been made since then, aside from the addition of a turbocharged model the following year.

Though its competitors are few, the Verano has some attractive rivals in the Mercedes-Benz CLA-Class and the Audi A3, and even base versions of the BMW 3-Series sedan.

MORE: Read our 2015 Buick Verano review

The Verano has somewhat conservative exterior styling, looking like a smaller, rounder Regal with a bit less character. The Buick ventiports are merely vestigial at this point, sitting as appliques atop the hood, and it would be okay if they disappeared from Buicks sooner than later. The Verano has a pleasant shape overall and makes the car appear larger than it is. Inside, however, is where the Verano truly pleases, with a very upscale feel for such a small car, and luxury touches like the voice-activated IntelliLink system and a heated steering wheel.

In the base Verano, brakes are strong four-wheel discs; and Buick's Quiet Tuning ethos brings a well-controlled ride yet surprisingly deft handling—with quick-ratio steering—compared to some cushy luxury-sedan alternatives. In drives of that base model, we've found it to be impressively refined, with one of the quietest interiors or any compact or even mid-size sedan, plus a rear seat that's contoured for adults—although the need to compromise legroom with front-seat occupants and a somewhat narrow rear bench do reveal it as a compact. Trunk space is great, however.

The Verano quickly earned Top Safety Pick status from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). However, the agency hasn't performed its new small-overlap crash test on the Verano yet, which means the compact Buick sedan no longer qualifies for the best Top Safety Pick and Top Safety Pick+ ratings. It's also rated at five stars for safety by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). All Veranos get ten standard airbags and a rearview camera; rear parking assist is optional.

For 2012, there was only one powertrain: a 180-hp, 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine and six-speed automatic transmission, with front-wheel drive. For 2013, the Verano added a new turbocharged engine. The 2.0-liter turbo four with 250 horsepower and 260 pound-feet of torque is coupled to either a six-speed manual or six-speed automatic transmission. Acceleration is quite strong, with 0–60-mph times of under 6.5 seconds. The manual transmission is an interesting option, giving the Verano a hint of sporty feel otherwise unavailable to it--but ultimately, a feature that seems less in character than its good automatic gearbox. While suspension tuning and steering effort have been dialed to a more sporting level, the Verano Turbo remains a quiet, comfortable ride, with just a slight increase in ride firmness and steering heft.

Base cars are priced from the mid-$20,000 range. The turbocharged car is essentially an option package on the base car, but it brings with it a nine-speaker Bose audio system; leather seating surfaces; rear park assist; blind-spot detection with cross-traffic alert; heated seats and a heated steering wheel. It's priced from just under $30,000, with the remaining options including features such as a power sunroof and voice-guided navigation system.

That navigation system plugs into Buick's IntelliLink, a connectivity interface that we find simpler than MyFord Touch or Lexus's Enform, while it accomplishes the same tasks, even Pandora and Stitcher streaming.

Along with other Buicks, the Verano now comes with a rearview camera as standard equipment.

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