• svegliando avatar svegliando Posted: 5/20/2013 9:47am PDT

    I'm not sure where this falls in the scheme of things, but what woudl happen to local radio? I find that when I take road trips, I like listening to small town radio. I recently rented a vehicle with satellite service. While on the road where AM/FM reception was sketchy, it came in handy. I'd imagine I'd use those streaming apps there as well. But as soon as I hit a town with local radio, I found it more interesting as it gave a good sense of place. I guess for me, it's about leaving the familiar for a new experience. I would hate to see that go.

  • richard avatar Richard Posted: 5/20/2013 10:34am PDT

    I feel the same way -- though as an information junkie, streaming news stations on Stitcher has its allure, too. Can't we have both?

  • william_b_noble avatar william_b_noble Posted: 5/20/2013 9:49pm PDT

    I bought a new car that had satellite radio, never activated it, and I've since sold the car - I can't imagine why it would be useful. I listen to local stations where the DJ is a human and the programming is by the choice of the human - I'd rather listen to someone who loves music play something I don't like than to a machine play stuff I've heard before a million times.

  • brightgarden avatar brightgarden Posted: 5/20/2013 12:06pm PDT

    Stitcher is oppressive bloatware I can't get off my Android phone. Different generational interest, perhaps. I use TuneIn to follow stations.
    I listen to "local" radio but that to me is NY City AM stations that I hope don't go away. We watched the rise, fall and plateau of programmed radio. I was at a Detroit industry car show in 1998 and Sirius and XM had big booths. Neither had actual working equipment - it wasn't designed yet! Only 2013 and that market tanked and plateaued. Their stock was up in the mid $60's around year 2000. It is now $3.51. Two reasons I never got it: 1) two words - Howard Stern, and 2)Monotonous programming. Helpful for low reception areas but there is something about listening to local while traveling long distance.

  • e3fan98 avatar e3fan98 Posted: 5/20/2013 1:36pm PDT

    Where do you get these surveys? Everyone I know listens to the radio. Not at all what you write about. Satellite radio is good when your in rural areas but in the mountains that can be blocked.

  • svegliando avatar svegliando Posted: 5/20/2013 3:25pm PDT

    I had the same experience a few years ago with satellite radio on the OR coast. On nearly every curve it would drop out.

  • BillE avatar BillE Posted: 5/20/2013 5:20pm PDT

    I listen to both XM and local radio and would hate to see local radio fade away, well unless WDHA here in NJ went first.

  • Vavatch avatar Vavatch Posted: 5/20/2013 5:50pm PDT

    I'm 48 and have not heard the radio in a solid decade. I only listen to music. (No news, talk show loudmouths, etc.) via my iPhone (and formerly an iPod). I currently subscribe to Rdio and Pandora, which gives me added variety and it works 90% of the time - we have T-Mobile, which is spotty when venturing outside the city or 'burbs, but 27,000+ songs in iTunes library more than makes up for it).

    Also, we do not subscribe to cable, though Comcast does get nearly $50/month for internet so we can watch movies on Netflix and HuluPlus, on demand. We also get DVDs from Netflix for those titles not streaming that we want now, though usually we wait as it will not kill us to wait. Haven't bought a DVD or Blu-ray in at least three years.

  • xamdam avatar xamdam Posted: 5/21/2013 9:35am PDT

    We may listen to our music on different media. But we will still listen to the radio for short commutes. Talk radio, sports radio and news will keep radio alive for a long time to come. Best thing about radio: it's free!

  • Bent Ears Audio Laboratories avatar Bent Ears Audio Laboratories Posted: 5/26/2013 4:11pm PDT

    Oldschool commercial radio has been dying a slow and painful death ever since Sirius and XM became available. As stations lose more and more listeners to other high-tech options, the commercial content of their broadcasts has increased from "irritating" to "appalling". The saddest thing about modern high tech is that the internet has just about killed international shortwave broadcasting.