• supercharged avatar supercharged Posted: 10/12/2012 10:17am PDT

    Honestly, I'm surprised it has taken this long for bootleg airbags to hit.

  • Cfthelin avatar Cfthelin Posted: 10/12/2012 11:45am PDT

    When I was involved in crash testing cars for the DOT, this came up. Airbags were (are) expensive and completely sealed. So, how could anyone know if it was good or more importantly, reliable. Very good manufacturers are in Asia but unless the vehicle has maker's information added to the driver's door, the owner cannot tell. It is very hazardous to open the ABS for inspection - with explosion and toxic chemical risks. Ask the firemen and EMTs coming to a serious MV collision how they feel about that.
    This is a reason for any used car buyer to check the online history of the vehicle. TCC should be able to assist.

  • Flatrate avatar Flatrate Posted: 10/13/2012 9:33pm PDT

    "Frankly, we tend to agree with Ditlow that shops -- including dealerships -- should conduct free scans for car owners, even when those shops weren't responsible for airbag installation on a particular vehicle"

    Why are we demanding free and/or reduced price labor and/or parts from an uninvolved 3rd party?

    Because the shady outfit that sold the fake airbags won't help. But reputable businesses might just give us something free if we act entitled and mumble something about goodwill and customer retention.

  • richard avatar Richard Posted: 10/14/2012 5:03am PDT

    It's not so much a matter of entitlement as it is dealers looking out for customers (and potential customers). Offering free inspections wouldn't cost anything apart from a worker's time, and it would give the public a sense of comfort that they might not otherwise get from a garage. With car sales booming at the moment, it's not unreasonable to think that dealerships might conduct a few inspections for the public good.