• scottstachowiak Posted: 5/18/2011 11:42am PDT

    For those of us who prefer manual transmissions, in cars that could with a decent list of options, this is good news. Why do the automakers think that just because I want to shift my own gears, I do not want an upgraded interior, sound system or other amenities?

  • wes Posted: 5/18/2011 10:39am PDT

    The first gear on the auto currently is so low that manually shifting I launch fr second as the up shift happens in sec.s anyway. I can't speak for hway perf. but intown because the torque is available so low the car is a blast to drive. I loaded up the car with me and my friends combined weight of about a thousand pounds and I expected it like a slug on it's way to a salt block. I honestly didn't notice any drop in performance. My biggest complaint was the lack of manual trany. I get about 28mpg imp. around town now that spring has sprung. I am looking forward to seeing the focus, the only neg. I saw was the interior looked some what dull. I am sure it would be easiy to overlook if they added two letters to the focus name. ST sounds good.

  • Kurt Posted: 5/18/2011 8:17am PDT

    @John, I haven't seen acceleration data on the 2012 car yet, but I've driven and reviewed the 2011 Cruze GTZ. Published data aside, the car feels slower than 9 seconds to 60, and isn't very enthusiastic when you mat the accelerator to pass on the highway.

  • Damien Posted: 5/18/2011 6:05am PDT

    Still lower mileage than the Focus (a more established nameplate, with greater power) and the Elantra (which is more attractive).

  • fb_1001015277 avatar John Posted: 5/18/2011 5:56am PDT

    Would have been nice to have some 0-60 numbers for this discussion. Looks like the 2011 Chevy Cruze ECO is 9 sec automatic, 10 sec manual. This is about average for a modern car. In the 1970's the average 0-60 time was 14 seconds.
    I wonder what 0-60 for the 2012 Chevy Cruze Eco will be? Is it still sub-10 sec? If so, it seems silly to call it slow.

  • Mac Posted: 5/17/2011 3:02pm PDT

    The other option would be to adopt a numberically lower final drive ratio and higher first through fourth ratios to compensate. That would give the desired "around town" performance and still allow for low rpm high cruising & associated higher mileage.